Post Series: The Christmas Series: Bilingual Poem: A list

Alright,
watch movies,
see specials,
read books,
attend a service,
put up lights,
see lights,
set up decorations,
decorate the tree,
buy gifts,
wrap gifts,
make cookies,
make food,
write cards,
send cards,
attend events,
wear special clothes,
wear a special hat,
do something charitable,
hmm …
hmm …
is there more?

Wait,
should this be a list?

 

Todo debido,
mirar películas,
ver especials,
leer libros,
asistir a una misa,
colgar luzes,
ver luzes,
colocar decoraciónes,
decorar el árbol,
comprar regalos,
envolver regalos,
hacer galletas,
hacer comida,
escribir tarjetas,
mandar tarjetas,
asistir acontecimientos,
llevar ropa especial,
llevar un sombrero especial,
hacer algo benéfico,
hmm …
hmm …
es mas?

¿Esperar,
sería una lista?

Note: As noted previously, M. Sakran is not bilingual, and therefore there may be some errors in the Spanish translation above.  Please forgive any errors in the translation.
 

P.S. Because of New Year’s Eve, New Year’s Day and the weekend, there will be no posts on M. Sakran’s blog of and about poetry and poetry related things December 31, 2015 – January 3, 2016.  Happy New Year in advance.

The Christmas Series will continue on January 4, 2016 and will end on January 5, 2016.

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Post Series: The Christmas Series: Artwork to inspire poetry: Wrapping paper

Wrapping Paper

This artwork is meant to look like wrapping paper.  It has two color combinations: red and green and blue and yellow.  Ideally, if this were real wrapping paper, it would match the size of the box that was wrapped so that the design would be on all six sides.

Some poetry inspirations that can come from this artwork are poems that include:

  • Gifts
  • Wrapping
  • Designs
  • A form inspired by the artwork (for example, some element representing the border and some elements representing the color blocks)

Post Series: The Christmas Series: Experimental Poetry Form: Twelve days of Christmas

This experimental poetry form is inspired by the twelve days of Christmas.  The form has twelve lines, each line has twelve syllables, and all of the lines rhyme.  The lines rhyme to add an additional layer of cohesiveness.  While finding twelve words that rhyme can be difficult, it is possible.  For example, the following twelve words rhyme: bell cell del dell ell excel fell gel jell sell tell well.  There are presumably other examples.

Post Series: The Christmas Series: Poem with an explanation: A third option

Two options?
Dead or fake?
No, no, no.
Maybe,
at one time,
the first had a logic.
Then,
considering,
the second had a logic.
But,
no, no, no.
A third option –
living.
Some say,
but see …
but no …
look after two weeks,
no, no, no.
Living,
yes,
living.
With a home,
yes,
a home.
Think,
living.
Generations.
Memories.
Real.
Yes,
living.
Now,
two choices,
stay at home,
or relocation.
Both have merits.
Stay at home,
means consistency,
but still,
stay at home.
Relocation,
means legacy,
and a row,
but,
every year.
But,
both have merits.
So,
dead – no,
fake – no,
living – yes.
Make the change.

 

This poem is about Christmas trees.  Normally, when presented with the option of having a Christmas tree, there are two choices presented: a cut tree or an artificial tree.  The problems are, a cut tree is dead and an artificial tree is fake.  Dead and fake seem like not the best choices for the home.  The poem presents a third option: a living tree.  Not a tree that was living, but was cut, but a tree that is still alive.  A tree, that at least for the Christmas season, lives in a pot.  The poem proposes that having something living is better than having something dead or fake.  The poem also proposes two options for the living tree.  Either a: a tree that always lives in a pot (thereby using the same tree every year) or b: planting the tree every year after Christmas and getting a new one the next year.  The poem suggests that this third option of a living tree is better than the first two of one that was cut or or one that is artificial.

 

Notes:

There will no posts on M. Sakran’s blog of and about poetry and poetry related things December 24 – December 27.  Merry Christmas in advance.

In the first post of The Christmas Series, it was noted that it had not been decided if The Christmas Series would end with this post or continue after Christmas day.

The post from December 17, 2015 entitled Post Series: The Christmas Series: Bilingual Poem: Begins, noted that “Christmas doesn’t end on the 25th, it begins.”  As such, M. Sakran has decided to continue The Christmas Series through January 5, 2016.  This corresponds to the twelve days of Christmas.  M. Sakran hopes that readers will enjoy the continued series.

Post Series: The Christmas Series: Poetry topic idea: Light

Today’s poetry topic idea is light.  There are many elements of light in Christmas.  Some examples include:

  • The light of the star in the Christmas story
  • The light of Christ
  • Candles
  • Christmas lights
  • Light as it relates to the winter solstice (for those in the northern hemisphere)
  • Metaphorical uses of light

Any of the above examples could be used as an idea in poetry.

Post Series: The Christmas Series: A photograph to inspire poetry: Citrus fruits on a tree

Citrus fruits on a tree

This is a photograph of citrus fruits on a tree.  While citrus fruits on a tree might not seem Christmas related, they in fact are.

First, these citrus fruits were on this particular tree on December 19, 2015.  Presumably, they will be on the tree on Christmas.

Second, Christmas trees are evergreens.  Although M. Sakran is not knowledgeable of the botanical definition of an evergreen, under the assumption that an evergreen is a tree that retains its leaves all year, then this citrus tree, at least where M. Sakran lives, appears to be an evergreen.

Third, Christmas is often celebrated in part with ornaments on evergreen trees.  If ornaments are considered to be a bright decoration, and in particular spherical ones, then these fruits on this evergreen tree (again, assuming it is an evergreen tree) are, in fact, natural Christmas ornaments.

Fourth, citrus fruits, although not necessarily these as they have proven to be quite sour, can often be a nice treat on Christmas day.

For the above reasons, this photograph of citrus fruits on a tree is Christmas related.  As such, it can inspire Christmas related poetry.  Some ideas include poems about:

  • Christmas treats (particularly citrus fruits)
  • Ornaments in nature
  • The natural world and Christmas
  • Things that might not at first glance seem Christmas related, being written about as being Christmas related

Post Series: The Christmas Series: Experimental Poetry Form: Presents

Number of lines: 8

Syllables per line: 8

Meter: Trochaic

Repeats: 3rd and 5th lines

Special conditions:

  Line 1: one word must start with the letter P

  Line 2: one word must start with the letter R

  Line 3: one word must start with the letter E

  Line 4: one word must start with the letter S

  Line 5: one word must start with the letter E

  Line 6: one word must start with the letter N

  Line 7: one word must start with the letter T

  Line 8: one word must start with the letter S

 

This experimental poetry form is based off of Presents.

Presents has eight letters, and so the form has eight lines and eight syllables per line.

Presents (as pronounced in the context of a gift) is trochaic, and so the meter of the form is Trochaic.

In the word Presents, the third and fifth letters are the same, so in the form, the third and fifth lines are the same.

Presents are gifts.  One form of this, is a box with something in it. The poetry form reflects this by having something inside of it.  In each line of the poem, one word in the line of that number starts with the same letter as the letter of that number in the word Presents.  For example, the fourth letter is Presents is an S, and so in the fourth line of the poem, one word must start with S.

This idea is a play on the idea of an acrostic poem, but instead of the first word of each line starting with a significant letter, a word inside the line (although it could presumably be the first word) starts with the letter.  Again, the idea is like a present: there is something hidden inside.

Post Series: The Christmas Series: Bilingual Poem: Begins

Remember,
this is the pre-celebration,
Christmas doesn’t end on the 25th,
it begins.

Recuerdan,
este es la ante celebración,
Navidad no fin en la veinticinco,
la empezar.

 

Note: As noted previously, M. Sakran is not bilingual, and therefore there may be some errors in the Spanish translation above.  Please forgive any errors in the translation.

Post Series: The Christmas Series: Poem: O’ hear the call

O’ hear the call of these bold words,
that fly from here like flocks of birds,
this Christmas time is not for rush,
or weight of gifts that seem to crush,
or things to do that press like herds.

Like from the whey one strains the curds,
remove from now the rope that girds,
and tell the list of tasks to hush,
O’ hear the call of these bold words.

Like numbers that some do call surds,
irrationality of words,
does try to make this time like mush,
and hide the truth as if with blush,
that One was born near to some herds,
O’ hear the call of these bold words.

Post Series: The Christmas Series: Poetry topic idea: Music

During Christmas there is all sorts of music.  Christmas songs can be heard from a variety of sources and presumably there are at least hundreds of Christmas songs.  The music of Christmas might make an interesting poetry topic idea.  For example, a poet could:

  • Write a Christmas song themselves (the song being a poem)
  • Think of elements that go into typical Christmas songs and use those elements in poetry
  • Think about things that make music in a way, like bells or chimes or birds, during Christmas time, and use those elements in a poem
  • Write about the ideas of traditional and contemporary

 

P.S. Recently, M. Sakran had two poems published in the Fall 2015 issue of Blood and Thunder: Musings on the Art of Medicine.