Post Series: The Christmas Series: Experimental Poetry Form: Three gifts

Today’s experimental poetry form, is based off of the three gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh.

First, since there are three gifts, the form will have three stanzas.

Second, since frankincense and myrrh have something in common, in that they have a scent, the second and third stanzas will each have a first line that starts with the letter S (as S is the first letter in scent).

Third, because gold is dense, the first stanza will have a relatively large number of syllables.

Fourth, because the words gold and myrrh are both one syllable words, and this is something they have in common, the first and third stanzas will have lines that rhyme within each stanza, which will be a trait that those stanzas have in common.

Fifth, because the word gold has four letters, the first stanza will have four lines.

Sixth, because frankincense and myrrh are not common today, the second and third stanzas will be right justified, which might be less commonly seen in poetry.

Seventh, because gold is an element, and is therefore something fundamental, each line in the first stanza will have ten syllables.  Ten, is in some way, a fundamental number.  This will mean, that with four lines, the first stanza will have forty syllables.  This also relates to the third item above of having the first stanza have a relatively large number of syllables.

Eight, since the first stanza has four lines (as per the fifth item above), and all of the items are gifts, the second and third stanzas will also have four lines each, as this will be something in common.

Nine, because frankincense and myrrh are not elements and are instead compounds of some sort, the second and third stanzas will be made of a combination of syllable count lines.  The stanzas will be made of lines that have 7, 6, 8, and 4 syllables.  This is a combination of syllable counts.  Also, as this totals 25 syllables, it helps with the idea of the first stanza having a relatively large number of syllables.

In summary, here is what the poetry form looks like:

Ten syllables, Rhyme A
Ten syllables, Rhyme A
Ten syllables, Rhyme A
Ten syllables, Rhyme A

First word starts with S, Seven syllables
Six syllables
Eight syllables
Four syllables

First word starts with S, Seven syllables, Rhyme B
Six syllables, Rhyme B
Eight syllables, Rhyme B
Four syllables, Rhyme B

 

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