Post Series: Poems with Explanations: There

There

Sitting there,
as a storm falls,
feeling it all hit.

Laying there,
in the incoherence,
but 4 and 2 aren’t 7.

Covered there,
as the earth shakes,
hoping snow falls.

Walking there,
with a stumble,
it is miles.

Listening there,
hearing the calls,
mist and stone.

Being there,
in disguise,
wondering of return.

 

This poem is about a person with a cold with a fever.  The poem is divided into six stanzas, that cover six moments the person has.

The first stanza starts with the person in the shower.  The person is sick, and so, rather than stand in the shower, as would be normal, the person sits (Sitting there).  They sit on the shower floor, as the hot water falls upon them (as a storm falls) and they take some bit of comfort in the heat (feeling it all hit).

In the next stanza, the person is in bed (Laying there).  It is in the middle of the night and the person has a fever.  They wake up.  Because of their tiredness and their fever they are incoherent (in the incoherence).  Their mind starts to move as they are half awake and half asleep and they can’t make sense of what they are thinking about (but 4 and 2 aren’t 7).

In the third stanza, the person is sitting on a sofa, covered completely with a blanket (Covered there).  The person starts to feel cold and they shiver (as the earth shakes).  As they do, they hope someone helps them and covers them with more blankets (hoping snow falls).

In the fourth stanza, the person is walking outside to get the mail (Walking there).  Because of their cold, they stumble as they walk (with a stumble).  At first they have some thought that the feet they are walking feels like miles, but as they stumble along, they decide that it is in fact miles (it is miles).  The distance they feel, has transcended in some sense, the idea of feeling.

In the following stanza, the person is sitting inside, and they hear their dog outside bark (Listening there).  They realize that their dog wants to go for a walk (hearing the calls).  In their mind, they want to walk their dog (mist).  Their body though is just too tired (stone).

In the last stanza, the person is in their house (Being there).  They don’t look like themselves.  Because of their cold they are dressed differently and just look different (in disguise).  As they are there, they wonder when they will be well again and be themselves (wondering of return).

In terms of form, this poem is six stanzas long.  Each stanza is three lines long.  Each stanza starts with a word followed by there.  This makes each first line of each stanza, two words long.

*****

Do you like poems with explanations?

M. Sakran’s self-published book of poems with explanations called Understanding: poems with explanations is available for purchase as an eBook for an available price of $0.99. Buy your copy today!

To help celebrate the self-publication of this book, there is a post series of poems with explanations on the blog.  Above is a poem with an explanation for the series.  This poem with an explanation (as well as the rest in the series) is not from the book.  It is a different one that is part of this post series for readers to read and enjoy.

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Post Series: Poems with Explanations: Alone

Alone

Was it a cigarette?
Was it a campfire?
Was it lightening?

There was the spark,
unseen,
in the trees,
far away.

  No one was there.

The shingles caught,
at first a smolder,
then the flame.

  No one was there.

Smoke in the attic,
rafters buckle,
and with some time,
the ceiling caves.

  An alarm sounds,
  no one hears.

The smoke in the living room,
windows shatter,
furniture burns,
and all crumbles.

  There are eyes,
  looking,
  but looking away.

Four walls,
three walls,
two and one,
the pile is there,
and all is gone.

  No one was there.

 

This poem is about a person becoming progressively more ill.  The person is alone and has no one to help them.  It uses a house fire as a metaphor.  This poem examines the idea of an isolated person encountering something where they need help.

The first stanza examines the cause of the illness.  It basically questions whether it started from something small (a cigarette), something medium (a campfire) or something large (lightening).  The questions are not answered in the poem.

The next stanza describes the start of the illness.  It starts small (spark) and unnoticed (unseen) (far away).  As a note, the fact that the illness started small is not meant to imply that it started from something small.  The idea is that even something big (such as a fire caused by lightening) still in essence starts with one point.

The third stanza (No one was there) is the first mention that the person is alone.

The next stanza uses a house as a metaphor for the person.  The stanza says, The shingles caught, at first a smolder, then the flame.  This describes the person first feeling the illness.  At first it is subtle (a smolder), but then it is more (the flame).  This stanza could be looked at as describing a person feeling the start of a fever (shingles representing the person’s head and a smolder and flame representing the heat of the fever).

The fifth stanza is a repeat of the third.  It shows that as the person got more ill, they were still alone.

The sixth stanza continues the progression of the illness.  The fire spreading in the attic could be looked at as representing the symptoms of the illness spreading in the person’s head.  By the end of the stanza, they feel it in their throat.  This is one way of describing the spread of the illness (which continues the way of description from stanza four) but other similar notions of the symptoms of an illness spreading could be applied.

The seventh stanza is like the third and the fifth, in that it shows that no one is with the person.  This stanza uses a somewhat different expression though.  It uses the metaphor of an unheard fire alarm to describe the person calling for help, but getting no response.

The eighth stanza continues the progression of illness symptoms.  One way to look at it, would be to say that the person started feeling something in their lungs (The smoke in the living room), their eyes began to hurt (windows shatter), they felt pain at different parts of their body (furniture burns) and they were overwhelmed by the symptoms (and all crumbles)

The next stanza is like the previous indented ones, in that it expresses the idea that the person is alone.  The stanza expresses the idea that there are people (There are eyes) and these people are observant and aware (looking) but they are just not aware of the person that is ill (but looking away).

One important point about this poem, is that people are not actively ignoring the ill person in the poem.  The person in the poem is isolated either by circumstance or by their own doing.  It is not though, a matter of neglect.  People are not willfully not helping the person, they are simply unaware the person needs help.

The tenth stanza describes the person getting severely more ill (as described by the walls of the house collapsing).  The person is very weak (the pile is there) and eventually, the person dies (and all is gone).

The last stanza is a repeat of the third and fifth.  It say, that the person died alone.

In terms of form, this poem is free verse in the sense that there was not a predefined from applied to it, nor a strict structure applied while it was written.  Despite this though, the poem is not entirely free of structure and still has form elements in it.

The first stanza consists entirely of questions.  Each question starts with Was it.  Additionally, the first two stanzas, start with Was it a, and then a word that starts with the letter c.

The second stanza starts with a line that is relatively longer in appearance than the other three lines in the stanza.  The first line says something, and the next three describe it.  The three short lines are meant to be choppy in a sense so that each point about the spark is made.

The third stanza, is repeated in the fifth stanza, and again repeated in the last stanza.  These stanzas are all indented to show a separation from the other ideas of the poem.

In the tenth stanza, the first two lines are similar.  They show the progression of the house falling in.  The third line breaks the form pattern (it does not continue two walls, one wall).  The idea of the break was to speed up the collapse of the house (and therefore the deterioration of the person).

*****

M. Sakran’s self-published book of poems with explanations called Understanding: poems with explanations is available for purchase as an eBook for an available price of $0.99. Buy your copy today!

To help celebrate the self-publication of this book, there is a post series of poems with explanations on the blog.  Above is a poem with an explanation for the series.  This poem with an explanation (as well as the rest in the series) is not from the book.  It is a different one that is part of this post series for readers to read and enjoy.

Post Series: Poems with Explanations: Introduction and Poem one (Three days)

As mentioned yesterday, M. Sakran has self-published a book of poems with explanations called Understanding: poems with explanations.  It is currently available as an eBook for an available price of $0.99.  Learn more about the book in yesterday’s post.  Buy your copy today!

To help celebrate this self-publication, there is going to be, starting today, a post series of poems with explanations here on the blog.  The series will consist of twenty posts (counting this one).  Each post will have a poem with an explanation.

As a point of clarity, these poems with explanations are NOT the same ones as in Understanding: poems with explanations.  These poems with explanations are different from the ones in the book.

Should anything of note happen during the series, it will be mentioned in a P.S. to a post.  Also, generally, there should be a post in the series each weekday, until the series is done.  If for some reason, there will be a weekday without a post, that will be mentioned in the post on the weekday before, at the latest.

Here is the first poem and explanation:

Three days

Walking around,
with that look,
and a moment,
of possibilities,

and then,
with a glance,
  a glance so regretted,
seen on the wall,
the rows.

A flood,
a feeling,
a speechless wonder,
and there standing,
wanting to run,
away.

But obligation,
but social situation,
but something about,
inner strength,

sitting down,
  not like a moment before,
and feeling it all,
and wondering,
what to do.

 

In this poem, a person is asked to house sit for some friends.  The poem starts, with the person in the house, right after the friends have left.  The person is going to be house sitting for three days.  That is the underlying beginning premise of the poem.  Within in this though, there is a poem about addiction.

The person in the poem is an alcoholic.  They are sober, and have been for a few months.  Their addiction was not on their mind when they agreed to house sit.  The friends, did not know of the situation.  The problem in the poem occurs, when as the person walks around the house, they see a wine bar, that they did not know was there.  The person then experiences a struggle.

In the first stanza, the person is in the house right after the friends have left.  They start by Walking around, and they have a certain stereotypical look of wonderment (with that look) as they take in the house, which is much better than the one they live in.  As they are there, they think of all they might do during this three day, what feels like, vacation (and a moment, of possibilities).

As the person is having this positive moment, in the second stanza, something changes (and then).  The person happens to move their eyes (with a glance), and in an instant, they regret it (a glance so regretted).  The person happened to look (seen on the wall) and see wine bottles on the wall (the rows).

When this happens, as expressed in the third stanza, the person is overwhelmed (A flood, a feeling, a speechless wonder).  In part, they have battled their addiction, and started to be sober, by avoiding alcohol.  In that instant, they feel confined (and there standing) and they want to run away and get away from this (wanting to run, away).  They are worried they will give in to their addiction.

In their mind, but not in their body, they almost move toward the front door to flee.  This is stopped though by their mind.  They feel they can’t leave.  They feel an obligation to their friends (But obligation) and they wonder how it would look to tell them that they are an alcoholic (which their friends do not know) and that they cannot handle being in the house.  They feel this would be socially awkward (but social situation).  In addition to these feelings, they also have a sense that they should be able to face this situation.  They feel like they should be able to resist the bottles on the wall (but something about, inner strength).

In the last stanza, the person sits down on a couch (sitting down), and there is a quick moment where they realize how everything has changed from just a moment before (not like a moment before).  They feel very overwhelmed (and feeling it all) and they wonder what they are going to do (and wondering, what to do).

This poem is essentially about a person facing an unexpected temptation in an addiction.  The poem is called Three days, because of the time in the house, but also because of the idea that that is how long the person will be facing this particular trial.

In terms of form, this poem is five stanzas long.  Stanzas one and two were written as one sentence, as were stanzas four and five.

The poem was written as a free verse poem, with the two indentions (one in the second stanza and one in the fifth) meant to set those two moments apart.

Although the poem is free verse, there are some interesting, although some in some sense unintentional, form elements.

Stanza one, for example, has a word count per line of 2, 3, 3, 2.  This seems like a pattern and is coincidently, the same word count pattern found in stanza four.

In the fourth stanza, there was the intentional form element of having the pairing of obligation and situation in lines one and two.  There was an idea of repeating a sound.  Additionally, the two but‘s in lines two and three also made a pairing.

As mentioned, the two indentions of stanzas two and five, were intentional and were meant to set those moments apart.

Announcement: Understanding: poems with explanations self-publication

M. Sakran is happy to announce that Understanding: poems with explanations has been self-published and is now available for purchase as an eBook! Buy your copy today!

Understanding: poems with explanations by M. Sakran

Understanding: poems with explanations

By M. Sakran

Copyright 2016 M. Sakran

 

Understanding: poems with explanations by M. Sakran, is a self-published collection of twenty original poems, with explanations of each of them.  The main purpose of this book is to help readers expand their understanding of poetry through the explanations.

The poems in the book cover a variety of topics such as poverty, homelessness, pain, neglect, crime and illness.

The explanations look at the overall meanings of the poems, the meanings of individual parts of the poems, and form in the poems.

Understanding: poems with explanations is currently available for purchase here: Understanding: poems with explanations.  It is currently available for $0.99.  The available price of $0.99 is not expected to change for the foreseeable future.

The foreword to Understanding: poems with explanations was written by Freya Pickard.  Freya was gracious enough to take the time to write the foreword and is much appreciated.

Freya has two blogs: Pure Haiku and Dragonscale Clippings.  If you are looking to read and submit traditional haiku, then check out Pure Haiku.  If you would like to read and find information about a variety of Freya’s writings and other things, then check out Dragonscale Clippings.

Freya also has three books available: The Rusalka Rítual & Other Stories, The Essence of Thyme, and Dragonscale Leggings.

Buy Understanding: poems with explanations by M. Sakran today!

(As a small note, unfortunately there have been some formatting issues with M. Sakran’s second book.  Hopefully these issues should not greatly affect the reading experience a reader has, depending on the device used to read the book.  M. Sakran is making efforts to have these issues resolved.  If any purchasers of the book experience any formatting issues, please let M. Sakran know by using the form on the contact page of this blog.  Thank you.)

Understanding: poems with explanations: Pre-order a copy

Do you enjoy M. Sakran’s blog of and about poetry and poetry related things?

Do you like the poems with explanations you’ve read on the blog?

Do you like the idea of supporting a writer whose work you enjoy?

If so, then please consider pre-ordering a copy of Understanding: poems with explanations by M. Sakran.  It is available as an eBook for an available price of $0.99.  Pre-order a copy today.

Understanding: poems with explanations: Who might enjoy this book?

M. Sakran’s new book, Understanding: poems with explanations, is currently available for pre-order as an eBook for an available price of $0.99. A question is, who might enjoy this book?

Well, first, hopefully a wide variety of people, but more specifically:

  • People who like to read poetry, but find that they have trouble sometimes understanding what poems mean.
  • People who like to write poetry, but find that they sometimes have trouble expressing certain ideas in certain ways.
  • People who feel like they don’t like poetry, because they “just don’t get it”.
  • People who like poetry, but have been wanting to read poems that are explained by the author to know what the poems really mean.

Understanding: poems with explanations, goes through twenty poems in a detailed way.  The explanations look at the overall meanings of the poems, the meanings of individual parts of the poems, and form in the poems.

By reading this book, in addition to learning what these poems mean, hopefully a person can learn more about understanding poetry.  This could help a person when they read poetry and when they write it.

This book could also provide some assistance to those who feel they “just don’t get poetry”.  By reading these twenty poems and their explanations, hopefully a little of the mystery will be gone.

Lastly, if you’ve ever read a book a poetry and wished that you could know what the author meant, well, this books does that for twenty poems.

Hopefully a wide variety of people will enjoy this new book.  Pre-order your copy today!

Understanding: poems with explanations: the cover

Here is the cover to M. Sakran’s new book (currently available for pre-order), Understanding: poems with explanations:

Understanding: poems with explanations by M. Sakran

Understanding: poems with explanations is a soon to be self-published collection of twenty original poems with explanations of each of them.

Readers may be wondering about the cover – Where did it come from?  Why was it chosen?  Does it have any meaning?  And so forth.

The poems in the book, Understanding: poems with explanations, are obviously explained in the book.  The cover, however, is not.  Here, therefore, is some explanation of the cover.

When trying to decide the cover for a book (a notably important decision), there are a lot of different options.  A person could pay for one or do it themselves.  A person could go the route of artwork or photography or just text or some combination.  There are decisions about colors and fonts and spacing and so forth.  It can be a lot.

The cover for this book is a computer altered photograph.  Generally, the computer alteration, made the colors brighter and fuller.  On top of that, text was added.

The photograph for the cover is of part of a citrus tree.  Although the fruits may look like limes, they are actually unripe oranges.

Originally, the idea for the cover was to take an up close photograph of an insect or a flower and computer alter it.  There have been examples of this type of photography (not computer altered) on the blog and on MSakran.com and they generally look nice.

It was proving difficult though to find something acceptable for the cover.  The cover would be a lasting thing and needed to be something special and fit in some way.  In the process of searching for an appropriate photograph, a lot of time was spent around a certain citrus tree.  This lead to the idea of, why not photograph the tree?

Many photographs of the tree were taken and the one selected seemed the best.  It had a combination of multiple fruits and full leaves.  After the improved effect of the computer alteration, it seemed to be the right choice.  It was bright, full, and stood out.

White text was chosen (in M. Sakran’s preferred font) to provide contrast.

In a certain way, the cover was arrived at simply.  It was a nice computer altered photograph.  In examining it after the fact though, there is a lot behind it.

Readers of the blog will know that citrus has been a recurring feature on the blog.  There are quite a few posts that reference citrus and there was even a citrus series on the blog.  The main reason for this is that M. Sakran currently has access to five citrus trees (one of which is very large).  Often these trees have interesting things on them and they make for good photographs and artwork subjects.  Additionally, citrus trees and things about them can lend themselves to certain poetic ideas.

Although trying to reflect something from the blog was not at the forefront of the decision to use this cover, it does turn out that it helps tie the book and blog together.

As defined by M. Sakran, because of the computer alteration, this cover is artwork.  Despite that though, many make look at it as a photograph and ask, “Why wasn’t a less photography based artwork (like charcoal or colored pencil or a water color artwork) used for the cover?”  Some may feel that a different type of artwork cover might fit a book with poetry better.  There were actually a few reasons for this.

One was the idea of standing out.  There was the thought to have a cover that would be different from other books that contain poetry.  Hopefully this bright green cover achieved that.

Another point, was the fact, that artwork sometimes has a hit or miss quality.  Some people really like an artwork, whereas others may not get it.  A photograph of a plant somewhat avoids this problem.  Not everyone will like a photograph of a citrus tree, but it shouldn’t confuse anyone.

Another idea, and one that M. Sakran is hesitant to admit, is that sometimes M. Sakran’s artworks can be hit or miss.  Not every artwork M. Sakran has created has come out amazingly (although quite a few on the blog and website, have been, in M. Sakran’s opinion, very nice).  Sometimes, some people, may not like them.  To help avoid this problem, an artistically altered photograph was used instead of artwork of another medium.

Some may wonder why a self-made cover was used as opposed to a paid for one.  The considerations for this were generally practical.  A good cover can cost quite a bit of money.  It was just not something M. Sakran could spend.  Also, there was the idea of copyright issues.  Although this can be discussed when a cover is purchased, these issues can generally be avoided when the cover is self-made.  Another practical issue was the idea of communication.  Seeing a cover in your head is one thing.  Communicating that to another person is another.  This was avoided with a self-made cover.

Some good questions to ask about the cover are, “How does the cover relate to the overall idea of the book?”  “How does the cover relate to the title of the book?”  “Does the cover relate to any specific parts of the book?”

In looking for a good subject for the cover, there was the idea of having it relate, somehow, to the idea of understanding.  That is part of the title and idea of the book and seemed something important to reflect.  The idea of understanding though, is a broad one, and it basically manifested itself as a search for something that seemed significant in some way (like an up close photograph of an insect might).  Upon reflection, it can be seen that this cover does reflect the idea of the book well.

The book is about explaining something (poetry) that might at first pass be somewhat mystifying.  This cover in some ways reflects that idea.

First, as mentioned, these fruits are oranges.  In the cover though, they don’t look like ripe oranges.  They either look like limes or like unripe citrus fruits (which they are).  This idea is a lot like the book.  At first pass, a poem in the book might seem to be about a certain thing or reflect a certain emotion.  The reality (as explained in the poem’s explanation) can be different though.

In another sense, this cover depicts something that is unripe.  This “unripe-ness” can be seen to parallel the idea of the book.  These fruit aren’t “finished” in some way.  The poems in the book, aren’t in some sense finished, until they are explained.

These fruit have a mystery.  What are they?  What are they going to be?  This mystery reflects the mystery of what the poems in the book really mean before they are explained.

In another sense, these fruits have something inside.  There is the outer peal that gives the appearance, but there is something hidden within.  This idea is a lot like the poems in the book.  The poems have a certain feel and ideas when read, but in addition to that, there is a meaning in them that is revealed in the explanations.

As a note, the cover to the book is not reflected in any particular poem in the book (and vice versa).  The idea was to have the cover give a universal representation of what was inside.

Hopefully readers of this blog, and future readers of the book, like this cover.  There was some thought to it, and hopefully, after reading this explanation of it, it will be even more appreciated.  If you would like to let M. Sakran know what you think of the cover, use the form on the contact page.

Poems with explanations: a list so far

As announced yesterday, M. Sakran has written a second book.  The book is called Understanding: poems with explanations and became available for pre-order this past Friday.  Pre-order your copy today!

Understanding: poems with explanations is a soon to be self-published collection of twenty original poems with explanations of each of them.

Readers of this blog will know that poems with explanations has been a regular category here on the blog.  So far, by M. Sakran’s count, there have been seventy four explained poems on this blog.  The idea was to help readers learn about poetry by providing an explanation of poems.

All of the poems with explanations that have been on the blog so far can be found here: poems with explanations.  There is also a list below with links to each one.  Read the ones you’d like to read.

As a point of clarity, none of the poems in Understanding: poems with explanations have been here on the blog.  The poems in the book have not been on MSakran.com nor previously published elsewhere by M. Sakran.  They are original to the book.

Although the poems and explanations in Understanding: poems with explanations, are in some ways different from what has been here on the blog, hopefully, if you enjoy the idea of reading poems and then finding out something of their meaning, you will enjoy the poems and explanations in the book.  Pre-order a copy today.

Poems with explanations from the blog:

tornado

Transitions

Ode to Oro

Leaving

Apples from orange trees

A timeless space

the boy and the monster

different

Fifty

ideas

Normalcy

Zoom

Two walked in

Moment

Step, step, step

Twenty doors

Empty

Views

Plight

Emptiness

Understanding

How long did the falling take?

sounds

A different bell

arranged

A third option

Searching (from The Christmas Series)

Christmas tree

fading

Finches and leaves

Hey look, it’s that guy with the dogs

Rows

Experience

October

Today, Yesterday, Tomorrow or some other time

meaninglessness

Walking inside

Ripening citrus fruit

The Flower Shop

Tension

Searching

A snail

Eyes and a wolf

Disappearing

Blurry remorse

Please heed the request

a stop

bird nests

a star

Fire place

The hummingbird and the crow

The clock strikes

Vacation

Perspective

Silent rain

Height

The Specter Looms

Caterpillar

The Lake

Communication

The Shadow Moth

Chicken Salad

Times

The orange wing

The pedals turned

Disillusionment

Fading

The gnat

Three o’clock

The Spider

Summer Winter

a letter

Crystal mistake

Illuminate the darkness

Announcement: Understanding: poems with explanations

M. Sakran is happy to announce that M. Sakran has written a second book! This book is called Understanding: poems with explanations and became available for pre-order this past Friday! Pre-order your copy today!

Understanding: poems with explanations Cover

Understanding: poems with explanations

By M. Sakran

Copyright 2016 M. Sakran

 

Understanding: poems with explanations by M. Sakran, is a soon to be self-published collection of twenty original poems, with explanations of each of them.  The main purpose of this book is to help readers expand their understanding of poetry through the explanations.  It is scheduled to be published on September 27, 2016, but can be pre-ordered now.

The poems in the book cover a variety of topics such as poverty, homelessness, pain, neglect, crime and illness.

The explanations look at the overall meanings of the poems, the meanings of individual parts of the poems, and form in the poems.

Understanding: poems with explanations is currently available for pre-order as an eBook here: Understanding: poems with explanations.  It is currently available for $0.99.  The eBook should be available to order on September 27th, and the available price of $0.99 is not expected to change for the foreseeable future.

The foreword to Understanding: poems with explanations was written by Freya Pickard.  Freya was gracious enough to take the time to write the foreword and is much appreciated.

Freya has two blogs: Pure Haiku and Dragonscale Clippings.  If you are looking to read and submit traditional haiku, then check out Pure Haiku.  If you would like to read and find information about a variety of Freya’s writings and other things, then check out Dragonscale Clippings.

Freya also has three books available: The Rusalka Rítual & Other Stories, The Essence of Thyme, and Dragonscale Leggings.

Pre-order Understanding: poems with explanations by M. Sakran today!