Artwork to inspire poetry: Jack-o-lantern

Jack-o-lantern

Happy Halloween!

This artwork is of a jack-o-lantern, as today is Halloween.

The artwork was originally made with charcoal and colored pencil.  That drawing was then scanned and computer altered.

All sorts of pumpkin/jack-o-lantern/Halloween poetry could be inspired by this artwork.  Here is an example haiku:

Looking in the eyes,
as brightness glowed from within,
the children were glad

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Poem with an explanation: this one, that one or no one

So,
here’s the problem,
there’s that over there,
and there’s this one,
and that one,
that want to be over there.

And there you are,
with whatever it is you have,
and you have to pick:
this one?
or that one?

The thing is,
and here’s that problem part,
you don’t agree with this one,
and you don’t agree with that one.

Really,
you don’t,
and it’s not little things,
like,
you know,
something, something and something,
no it’s big things,
with this one,
it’s this, this and this,
and with that one,
well,
it’s that, that and that.

Really,
a lot of this’s,
and a lot of that’s,
so what to do?

Do you pick this one,
or do you pick that one?

Either way,
there’s either this’s or that’s.

Do you pick neither?
An empty void,
as stars flee,
and sound escapes,
hold on,
too much melodrama,
but still,
do you pick neither?

So what to do?
Do you pick this one,
or that one,
or no one?

If only there were,
someone.

 

This poem is about voting.  It examines a problem voters can have when trying to decide between two candidates in a race: What if you don’t agree with either of them?  What do you do?

The first stanza, starts to lay out the situation.  There’s a political office to be filled and there are two candidates for the race.

The next stanza imagines the voter in the voting booth having to decide between two candidates in the race.

The third stanza says the problem: you don’t agree with either of the candidates on issues.

The fourth stanza expands the disagreement.  It basically says that you disagree with both candidates on important issues, not just little things.

The fifth stanza says that you have lots of issues where you disagree with both candidates.

The next stanza, then proposes the question: which candidate do you pick?

After that, in the next stanza, it states a problem with picking either one, namely, you will be voting for a person with whom you disagree with on many issues.

The eighth stanza, proposes a solution: vote for neither and leave that spot blank.  The stanza goes on to dramatize the idea of not picking a candidate, and then questions if this can really be a solution.

The ninth stanza asks the question: who do you pick?  Either candidate, or neither candidate?

The tenth stanza then states the hope that if only there were a candidate you agreed with.

This poem takes a slightly silly and obscured approach to examining a problem people face.  What do you when you disagree with both candidates for a political office?  Do you pick one of them, and end up voting for someone you don’t agree with, or do you not vote for either, and lose your vote in that race?  The poem does not give an answer (sorry).

In terms of form, one aspect is the repetition of the words this and that.  The idea was to provide a sense of generalization.  This poem is not about specific candidates, races or issues, it’s just about the idea of a problem that can occur when voting.

Another aspect of form, is the inclusion of the idea of you.  This poem is written to the reader, as opposed to something that is written just for the reader to read.

The poem has ten stanzas.  Although that count was not intentional, it does add a form aspect to the poem.

The last two stanzas, have a repeat of the word or sound “one”.  There’s this one, that one, no one and someone.
 

*****

Do you like poems with explanations?

M. Sakran’s has a self-published book of poems with explanations called Understanding: poems with explanations is available for purchase as an eBook for an available price of $0.99. Please consider purchasing a copy.

Experimental Poetry Form: Four blocks

This experimental poetry form includes the elements of layout on the page, line count, word count and repeats.

The form consists of four blocks.  They are laid out as follows:

Block 1                           Block 2

Block 3                           Block 4

The blocks as a group are centered (or roughly so).  Block 1 is to the upper left, Block 2 is to the upper right, Block 3 is to the bottom left and Block 4 is to bottom right.  There is more space between the columns than the between the rows.  The actual distances can be varied.

Secondly, each block consists of four lines of twenty words total.  There is no requirement regarding the number of words per line.

In terms of repeats, at least two words from Block 1, must appear in Block 2.  A different two words (at least) from Block 2, must appear in Block 3.  Finally, a further different two words (at least) from Block 3, must appear in Block 4.

Here is an example poem written in the form.  The repeated words are noted by being bold (first set), italicized (second set) and underlined (third set):

    Two fantail goldfish,                                                            The two knights battle,
    swim through a resin log,                                                   each with a steel long sword,
    eat amazon and rosette sword plants,                            upon a wide log,
    and play in the small bubbles.                                           that spans the fast moving river.

    The battle went on for days,                                                For days they fought on,
    over who would own the lone river,                                   beside the turbid flow,
    that flowed speedily beneath,                                             their swords moved speedily,
    the tank’s filter.                                                                      as each sought to claim the land.

Post Series: Poems with Explanations: No, you see

Today’s post is the twentieth and last post in the post series: poems with explanations.

Hopefully readers have enjoyed the series.  Hopefully all of the poems were enjoyable to read by themselves, but also, hopefully, the explanations expanded their value.  Hopefully readers learned more about poetry through the series.

If you liked the series and like poems with explanations in general, then please consider purchasing a copy of M. Sakran’s self-published eBook, Understanding: poems with explanations.  The eBook is a collection of twenty original poems, with explanations of each of them.  It is available for a price of $0.99.  It can also be purchased with currencies besides the U.S. dollar (see near the bottom of the post, Post Series: Poems with Explanations: Obstruction, for a list of usable currencies and links).  Again, if you liked the series and like poems with explanations in general, then please consider purchasing a copy.

The last poem and explanation of the series is below.

No, you see

What’s the matter?

You tired?

Alright, take a rest.

  Standing.

  Standing.

  Crouching.

  Left over middle.

  Right over middle.

  Left over middle.

  Right over middle.

  Picking up one.

  Picking up two.

  Standing.

Hi.

Hmm?

Oh, nothing, you see …

No, wait, you don’t understand.

No, you see there,

  One, two, three.

No, you

 

This poem is about someone getting shot and killed.  There are three beings in the poem: the person who is shot (the shootee), the shootee’s dog, and the shooter.  The poem begins with the shootee walking their dog and coming in front of the shooter’s house.  This poem is about misunderstanding and overreaction.

In the first line of the poem, the shootee asks their dog What’s the matter?.  The dog has stopped walking and is panting by the side of the street.  It is early morning.

In the second line of the poem, the shootee realizes that their dog is tired and asks their dog a rhetorical question about it.

In the third line, the shootee tells their dog to take a rest.  Where the person is walking, there are ditches in front of the homes.  In this line of the poem, as the shootee lets go of the leash and stands by the side of the road, the dog walks down into the ditch and lays down.

The next ten lines are indented.  These lines describe what the shootee does while their dog rests.  At first the shootee just stands.  The dog is resting for a while and the standing feels like it goes on.  The shootee’s legs get a little tired and so they crouch down.  They find some pine needles and start braiding them together.  They then stop this, and pick up a couple of pebbles and move them in their fingers.  After this, the shootee stands up again.

When the shootee stands, the homeowner comes out of their house.  The shootee says, Hi.  The homeowner (the shooter) is upset that someone has been standing in front of their house and asks angrily, “What are you doing here?”

The shootee is taken aback by this question and emotion and responds, “Hmm?”

The shooter then asks the question again, as they move closer and more angrily toward the shootee.

The shootee realizes the misunderstanding.  They realize that the shooter can only see them and not the dog, because the dog is in a ditch.  They understand the concern of the shooter.  They try to clear things up and explain by starting “Oh, nothing, you see …”

The shooter interrupts the shootee.  The shooter yells to the shootee to get away from the house.  The shooter moves closer and more angrily.

The shootee tries to explain again.

The shooter then repeats the demand that the shootee get away from the house.

The shootee tries to explain again.  As they do, they motion with their arm at the dog in the ditch.

When the shooter sees the shootee’s arm move, they assume the shootee is going to do something violent.  The shooter pulls out a gun and shoots the shootee.

The shootee hears three shots.

The shootee tries to explain as they die.

 

This poem is about a misunderstanding and overreaction that led to a shooting and killing.

The shootee in the poem was innocent.  In some sense, they made the mistake of loitering outside of someone’s home, but they had no criminal intent.

The shooter in the situation, was not really bad, but simply saw someone standing and waiting too long outside of their house.  The shooter never saw the shootee’s dog, which was in a ditch.  They felt threatened by the situation and even more threatened when they confronted the shootee and the shootee did not immediately leave.

This poem that is about a simple situation that escalated and went in the wrong direction.

One interesting aspect of this poem, in terms of its presentation, is that there is only one focus.  In the poem, the dog’s actions are not written out.  Also, the voice of the shooter is not directly articulated.  Only the words, and with one exception, only the actions of the shootee are shown.  The exception is the three gun shots.  These are articulated by the count in the poem.

In terms of form, in the poem, actions are indented two spaces (the actions of the person as they wait for their dog, and the gun shots).  Also, the last line ends abruptly, even without ellipses, to signify the shootee died.

Post Series: Poems with Explanations: The play

Hey, the play’s beginning.

What do you mean you won’t be there for the start?

What else do you have to do?

Alright, fine, when the lead actor calls for audience involvement, you show up.

Hey, the play’s a third of the way through, the lead actor’s calling for audience involvement.  What you’re supposed to do first, is make a lot of noise.

Now watch the play.

What do you mean?  What’s wrong with the lead actor saying their lines behind that wall most of the time?  It’s for dramatic effect.  Don’t you know about theater?

How many times are you going to go to the concession stand?  You’ve missed some really important parts.

What’s that?  Oh, the lead actor’s speaking in Dutch.  You do know Dutch, right?

What’s that?  You have to go make a phone call?  Alright, but this is a good part coming up.

Hey, you’ve missed about a quarter of the play with that call.  What?  Oh, what happened?  Well, that guy there, well, he used to be married to her over there, but now he’s married to her over there.

Hold on.  What’s that?  Hey, do you hear that?  They are saying the lead actor has to leave the play.  They need someone to take his place and finish it for him.  Hey, you’ve been watching the play right?  Hey, over there, this person here can take over.

Don’t worry.  You’ll be fine.  How hard can it be to finish an actor’s role in a play you’ve only seen part of?  Here, here’s the program from the play.  It should be enough to help you.  You’ll do fine.

 

This poem is about an adult child settling a recently deceased parent’s estate as well as closing out their life.  It uses a person watching a lead actor in a play as a metaphor.

In the poem, there are three main people: the lead actor (representing the parent), the person watching the play referred to as “you” (the adult child) and a third person who is also watching this play.  This third person is the one speaking in the poem.  Their words are the only one the reader directly reads.

The idea of the poem is to express the difficulty involved in settling a parent’s estate and closing out their life.  The idea is that a parent has lived a whole life that the adult child was only part of.  Now that adult child has to figure out aspects of their parent’s life from incomplete sources and close things out.  The child has to figure out all sorts of things: bank accounts, property, vehicles, a will, bills, debt, credit cards, mortgages, insurance, etc.  There are also things like: email accounts, social media accounts, personal items, etc. to deal with.  Information about these things may be unorganized and limited.  The idea is one of dealing with uncertainty.

The idea of the poem is a simple one: How does a person close out another person’s life, when they only know so much about it?

Now, as a point, there is obviously more to dealing with a parent’s death besides the practical matters addressed by the poem.  Those things are obviously very important, they are just not the focus of this poem.

Here are what the different paragraphs mean:

First paragraph: The third person (not the parent or the adult child) announces that that parent has been born.  This is the start of the play.

Second paragraph: The third person is questioning the fact that the adult child won’t be there for the start of the play (i.e. the start of their parent’s life).  The idea here is somewhat metaphysical in that the third person is questioning someone who is nonexistent at the time they are being questioned.  The idea in the poem though is simply to say that the adult child missed the start of their parent’s life (and therefore begins the idea of lacking information).

Third paragraph: This continues the idea of the second paragraph and is meant to be a little humorous.  The thing that prevents the adult child from seeing the start of the play, is their nonexistence at the time it starts.  The third person in some way questions what could be so important that they miss the start of the play.

Fourth paragraph: The third person is telling the adult child that they can basically start watching the play when they are born.  The idea here, is that that is the moment when the adult child can start to see their parent’s life.

Fifth paragraph: When the play is a third of the way through, the parent’s life is a third of the way through.  At this moment, the adult child is born.  The third person says humorously that the first thing they are to do is make noise.

Sixth paragraph: Here the third person is telling the adult child to watch their parent’s life.

Seventh paragraph: The idea here is that while a child is watching their parent’s life as they grow up, they are actually missing most of it.  For example, the child does not see their parent at work.  The unheard words of the adult child at this point are basically saying that they are having trouble understanding the play because they can’t hear or see parts of it.  The idea here is to stress that the adult child will have limited information later.

Eighth paragraph: The idea here is that the third person is criticizing the adult child for missing parts of the play.  The idea is that the child grew up and had a life.  They missed parts of their parent’s life.

Ninth paragraph: The point here is that the adult child, because they lack certain knowledge about their parent, has a hard time understanding certain things about their life.

Tenth paragraph: In this part, the adult child grew up and left home.  That is represented by the phone call.

Eleventh paragraph: Here, the third person is saying that the adult child missed a lot of their parent’s life when they left.  They try to summarize what happened while they were gone.

Twelfth paragraph: This is where the parent dies.  The adult child at this point has to take over, settle their parent’s estate and close out their life.

Thirteenth paragraph: The third person states the main idea of the poem, that it is difficult to settle someone’s life when you only know part of what has happened in it.

In terms of form, this poem is presented as a one-sided conversation.  Only one voice is heard: that of the mysterious third person.  The adult child and the parent are not heard from directly.

*****

Do you like poems with explanations?

M. Sakran’s self-published book of poems with explanations called Understanding: poems with explanations is available for purchase as an eBook for an available price of $0.99. Buy your copy today!

To help celebrate the self-publication of this book, there is a post series of poems with explanations on the blog.  Above is a poem with an explanation for the series.  This poem with an explanation (as well as the rest in the series) is not from the book.  It is a different one that is part of this post series for readers to read and enjoy.

Post Series: Poems with Explanations: The burial of Sarah

In the cold ground the form did lay,
so still and calm as snow did fall,
and there one said some words that night,

          as stars did shine above so bright.

And words did roam to find a place,
and one was said that fit the sight,

          as stars did shine above so bright.

And in the cold as darkness came,
some tears did fall for one now known,
and there one stood and felt the plight,

          as stars did shine above so bright.

 

This poem is about the burial of a homeless woman.  The woman died of illness, and a homeless man, who was near her when she died, is burying her.

In the first stanza, the woman is in the ground before she is covered with dirt.  It is quiet and cold and snow is falling.  By the grave, a man is standing and saying some type of words.  It is night.  There is a refrain after this that mentions the stars in the sky above.

In the stanza after the refrain, the man standing by the grave saying some words, finds a problem.  He does not know the name of the woman he is burying.  He wants to say her name with his words.  As he searches for a name in his mind, he looks at her in the grave, and decides that Sarah fits the way she looks.  He names her this as he says more words.  After this, there is a refrain about the stars in the sky.

After the second refrain, the next stanza starts with the man pushing dirt onto Sarah.  He starts to cry.  He did not know Sarah, but since he has named her, he feels a connection to her and feels a sadness at her death.  He feels a pain at the circumstances that caused Sarah to die the way she did and led to her having to be buried in a field by someone she didn’t know.  After this is a refrain about the stars in the sky above.

This poem is about one person burying another person whom they don’t know.  In the process, they find it necessary to give the person they are burying a name.

This poem uses the experimental poetry form Refrains, that was posted on this blog on July 22, 2016.  The description of the form can be read from the post.

In this poem, there is a certain ambiguity.  What is happening in the scene is referred to in a poetic way, rather than directly (with the exception of the title).  This reflects the situation of the man in the poem.  He is burying someone he does not know.  He decides it is right to give this person a name.  He didn’t feel a person should be buried nameless.  The man is expressing a feeling, emotion and idea, but there is a struggle to it.  This is reflected in the style of the poem.

In the poem, each of the stanzas has a somewhat depressing quality.  Even without knowing what the poem is about, the quality should come through.  The refrains though, are the opposite.  The first stanza, for example, mentions cold ground, a form laying in it, and night.  The refrain then mentions shining bright stars.  This contrast was reflective of the situation.

The poem shows a depressing scene: a homeless woman died outside in the cold night because of illness.  She was alone except for a nearby man who didn’t know her.  There was no one to help her and no one to bury her properly.

Despite this though, there is a goodness in the poem: the man.  The man couldn’t help Sarah before she died, but he did what he could afterwards.  He buries her, says some words that he feels will be respectful of her life and do something for her, and he gives her a name.  The actions of this man are reflected in the bright shining stars.

*****

Do you like poems with explanations?

M. Sakran’s self-published book of poems with explanations called Understanding: poems with explanations is available for purchase as an eBook for an available price of $0.99. Buy your copy today!

To help celebrate the self-publication of this book, there is a post series of poems with explanations on the blog.  Above is a poem with an explanation for the series.  This poem with an explanation (as well as the rest in the series) is not from the book.  It is a different one that is part of this post series for readers to read and enjoy.

Post Series: Poems with Explanations: Shapes

It is what you see,
but it isn’t what you see.

When in a sea,
looking at the sea,
and thinking of the sea,
is it what you see?

All that you see,
floating in the sea,
does start with c,
no matter what you see.

Do you see?

 

This poem is a riddle.  Before reading the explanation, take some time to think about what the poem is referring to, and make a guess.  Then, read on, to see if you were right and find out what the poem means.

*

*

*

The answer to the riddle is:

clouds.

That is what the poem is about.  The first stanza says, “It is what you see, but it isn’t what you see.”  This is referring to the idea of seeing shapes in clouds.  On the one hand, the shape is what a person sees.  A person thinks a cloud looks like a rabbit, for example, and so, in a sense of description, it is a rabbit.  In a realistic sense however, it isn’t a rabbit.  It’s a cloud.

In the second stanza, the imagery is of a person lying in the grass looking up at the clouds.

The first line says, “When in a sea“.  This is referring to the “sea of grass” the person is lying down in.

The next line says, “looking at the sea“.  This is referring to looking at the sky, which can be referred to metaphorically, as a sea.

The third line says, “and thinking of the sea“.  The idea here was to have something a person could imagine while looking at the clouds.  In this case, the thing is the sea.  It can bring up images of fish, dolphins, sail boats, etc.

The last line asks a question, “is it what you see?”.  The idea here references the idea in the first stanza.  If a person is lying in the grass, looking up at the sky, thinking of the sea, and they see a cloud that looks like a dolphin, is that cloud a dolphin?  The answer, not given in this stanza, is the same as from the first stanza.

Depending on the setting and the way the question is asked, the answer could be yes or no.  If someone were lying in the grass with the person and they were both saying what the clouds were shaped liked, and one asked the other, “Is that a dolphin?”  The answer might be yes.  In another setting though, if someone pointed at the sky and asked the same question, the answer given could be no.

The next stanza refers to the same idea of seeing shapes in the clouds.  It brings up a somewhat silly point, that regardless of what a person sees in the clouds, that the clouds are still clouds.  So, for example, if a person sees a dolphin in the clouds, it is still a cloud.  Regardless of what a person sees, they are seeing a cloud, and cloud starts with c.

The last stanza is asking the reader a question.  It is basically asking, “Do you know the answer to the riddle?”

In terms of form, every lines ends with the sound of “see” (either see, sea, or c)

*****

Do you like poems with explanations?

M. Sakran’s self-published book of poems with explanations called Understanding: poems with explanations is available for purchase as an eBook for an available price of $0.99. Buy your copy today!

To help celebrate the self-publication of this book, there is a post series of poems with explanations on the blog.  Above is a poem with an explanation for the series.  This poem with an explanation (as well as the rest in the series) is not from the book.  It is a different one that is part of this post series for readers to read and enjoy.

Post Series: Poems with Explanations: With regret

Dear S.,

Alright, how does this start?  How do these words come out and float around, but not hit the target (but still hit the target)?  You know what this is going to say.  Why else would this be here?

It failed.

Wow, there’s a finality to that.  There it is.  It failed.  The coin is thrown in the pond.  It’s gone.

What are you thinking now?  Your mind is probably going through a whole kaleidoscope of things.  All those colors blending.

You have questions.  You’re probably upset.  If you’re wondering, there is an explanation.  But … does it really matter?  Who cares if this can be justified?  It just is.

There’s a desire here to apologize.  Something though, makes it feel condescending.  After all this … a little sorry?  The feeling of not wanting to hear it is understandable.

There isn’t anything that can make this better than it is.  There’s really no way to glue the vase back together.  Please know, whatever you feel should be felt here – it is.

With regret,

A. P.

 

This poem is written as a letter.  A. P. is writing a letter to tell S. that something failed.  A. P. is regretful and sorrowful but realizes that words are lacking in this situation.  A. P. is trying to express feelings and empathy, but is struggling.

The name S. simply stands for Someone.  The name A. P. stands for A Person.  While at first glance, this may seem a little bit underwhelming, the idea here was just to make these people nondescript.  They have no age, no gender, no nationality.  They are blank in some sense.  The idea was to not have the people distract from the letter.

The letter starts with Dear.  Starting a letter with To is impersonal.  Dear can be personal or impersonal depending on the situation.  In this case, there is a slight personal quality to it.

A. P. starts by asking a question. A. P. is trying to signify a difficulty in expressing something. They aren’t getting to the point right away.  Despite this though, in some way, by starting off point, A. P. is signifying to S. that the information is going to be bad.  The idea is that a person might not talk around a point, if the point were good.

The next sentence, again, reflects A. P.’s difficulty with expression.  A. P. wants to say something, without saying it.

In the next two sentences, A. P. realizes the conclusion from above – that not directly saying something, is implying that the something is going to be bad.  There is a presumption here, that A. P. not only realizes that S. sees this, but also, that S. knows what this letter is referring to.  A. P. realizes that S. has figured out the unspoken subject of the letter.

In the next paragraph, A. P. is short and direct.  A. P. gets to the point.  In the first paragraph, A. P. was struggling to say something.  Here, A. P. has forced themselves to say what they were afraid to say before.  A. P. doesn’t say what failed.  A. P. understands that S. will know what A. P. is referring to, without A. P. saying what it is.

In the next paragraph, A. P. writes again like the first.  There is almost an aside.  There is almost a commentary on the words of the letter.  A. P., in the first sentence, realizes that the paragraph before was like jumping from something.  There’s a finality to it.  There’s a sense, that once the jump is made, there is no way to go back.  That is how A. P. feels about directly saying that the something in question failed.  A. P. states the fact again and then uses a metaphor of a coin being thrown in a pond as an analogy.

After this, A. P. realizes that S. is impacted by the news that this something failed.  They wonder what S. is thinking about it.  They realize that there must be a mixture of different thoughts and emotions.

In the next paragraph, A. P. tries to express the idea that the mixture of things that S. is thinking and feeling, really doesn’t matter in a sense.  A. P. feels that the finality of the something failing, is so final, that there really isn’t any sense of talking about it.  It would be like analyzing something that will not be done again, what would be the point?

At this point, A. P. wants to apologize.  A. P. feels at fault for the failure.  A. P. resists this though.  They almost envision an upset S. saying, “After all this … a little sorry?”  A. P. realizes that S. will see the sorry as insufficient, and so much so, that it might be angering, and so A. P. doesn’t write it.

In the last paragraph, A. P. again expresses the finality of what has failed.  They use the analogy of trying to glue a shattered vase back together.  A. P. realizes that S. wants A. P. to feel something about this.  A possibility might be regret.  A. P. writes that they are feeling what they think S. would want them to feel.

A. P. then ends the letter expressing regret.

This poem is written as a letter, but still has poetic elements.

As mentioned above, the writer and receipt of the letter are only referred to with initials.

A. P. asks rhetorical questions.

Almost all of the letter has an indirect quality to it.

Analogies are used.

There are ten parts to the letter.

There is the idea that what failed, is never said.

A. P. doesn’t directly refers to themselves in the letter, with the exception of the ending.

Although unintentional, it does turn out that every letter of the alphabet was used at least once in the letter.

*****

Do you like poems with explanations?

M. Sakran’s self-published book of poems with explanations called Understanding: poems with explanations is available for purchase as an eBook for an available price of $0.99. Buy your copy today!

To help celebrate the self-publication of this book, there is a post series of poems with explanations on the blog.  Above is a poem with an explanation for the series.  This poem with an explanation (as well as the rest in the series) is not from the book.  It is a different one that is part of this post series for readers to read and enjoy.

Post Series: Poems with Explanations: The celebration ends

The distant look,
the fourteenth time,
the eyes then pause

the flag is waved!

In a moment,
the color’s checked,
the eyes squint tight,

and there it is!

The shouts of joy,
the cheers resound,
banners fill the streets.

Parades begin,
the speech is said,
streamers fill the air.

But something is said,
a questioning thought,
the trumpets blast,
and drums do play.

But something is said,
a questioning thought,
acquiescence occurs,
call in the man.

The man comes in,
and peers on out,
he says it’s this,
and is not that.

Banners fall,
trumpets too,
and drums do have no beat.

But something is said,
a questioning thought,
a check again,
the sight is this.

The empty streets,
the empty square,
a littered scene,
and all are gone.

 

This poem is about happiness being dashed.  In the poem, a person believes they have found out that something good has happened, but then they find out they were wrong.  Although this idea could pertain to many things, one example might be a person thinking they have won a prize, but then finding out that they didn’t.

In the first stanza, the person is checking the results of something (The distant look).  They are anxious to know the results and have been checking repeatedly (the fourteenth time).  This time is different from the rest though, because the person believes they see a result (the eyes then pause).  The person takes a moment, and in the next stanza, they come to the excited realization that the result is actually there (the flag is waved!).

In the third stanza, the person takes a second (In a moment) to scan and see what the result is (the color’s checked).  They focus on it (the eyes squint tight), and in the next stanza, they see not only the result, but the result they have been wanting (and there it is!).

In the fifth stanza, the person celebrates what has happened (The shouts of joy, the cheers resound, banners fill the streets).

In the sixth stanza, the person continues the celebration and starts to tell other people the good news (Parades begin, the speech is said, streamers fill the air).

In doing this though, in the seventh stanza, someone questions if the person was right in what they saw (But something is said, a questioning thought).  The person though, is overwhelmed with happiness, and ignores this idea (the trumpets blast, and drums do play).

In the eighth stanza, the someone questions the person again (But something is said, a questioning thought).  The person thinks this questioning is nonsense, but they decide to humor the someone (acquiescence occurs) and have someone else check the result (call in the man).

This someone else arrives (The man comes in) and checks the result (and peers on out).  They see what it is and they tell the person that they made a mistake.  They say the person did not get the result they wanted (he says it’s this, and is not that).

In the tenth stanza, the person is dejected (Banners fall, trumpets too, and drums do have no beat).

In the eleventh stanza, the person, with a small hold on hope, asks if the someone else might be wrong (But something is said, a questioning thought).  The someone else checks the results again, and confirms that the person did not get what they wanted (a check again, the sight is this).

In the last stanza, the person is forlorn.  They don’t know what to do, and they are quiet and walk away (The empty streets, the empty square, a littered scene, and all are gone).

This poem has a number of form elements.

The pair of stanzas one and two, has a similar structure to the pair of stanzas three and four.  Stanza one is three lines and stanza two is one line that is an exclamation.  This is the same for stanzas three and four.

Also, looking at the first four stanzas, all of the eight lines have four syllables each.

Stanzas five and six are similar in that both have a syllable count per line of four, four and five.  Also, there is connection between the last lines of each of the stanzas.  In stanza five, banners fill the streets.  In stanza six, streamers fill the air.

In stanzas seven and eight, the first two lines match.

In stanza nine, each of the lines has four syllables.  Additionally, lines one and two end in antonyms.

In stanza eleven, the first two lines from stanzas seven and eight are repeated again.  Stanza eleven has the same syllable count per line pattern as stanza seven.

In stanza twelve, all of the lines have four syllables (like stanza nine).  Additionally, the first two lines both start with the empty, and then a word that starts with s.

*****

Do you like poems with explanations?

M. Sakran’s self-published book of poems with explanations called Understanding: poems with explanations is available for purchase as an eBook for an available price of $0.99. Buy your copy today!

To help celebrate the self-publication of this book, there is a post series of poems with explanations on the blog.  Above is a poem with an explanation for the series.  This poem with an explanation (as well as the rest in the series) is not from the book.  It is a different one that is part of this post series for readers to read and enjoy.