Post Series: The Dragonfly Series: Bilingual Poem: Contento o Triste?

The dragonfly,
caught the mosquito,
and there were questions:

Is this happy?

Or is this sad?

 

La libélula,
cogió el mosquito,
y estuvo preguntas:

¿Es contento?

¿O es triste?

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Post Series: The Dragonfly Series: Poetry topic idea: wings

As this is The Post Series: The Dragonfly Series, it would seem, that a natural poetry topic idea for it would be “dragonflies”.  That would be the case, however, dragonflies has already been used as a poetry topic idea on this blog.  It was used in the July 20, 2015 Blog Post: Poetry Topic Idea: Dragonflies.

Given that, there had to be another selection for this (as well as another) poetry topic idea for this post series.

Using “dragons” or “flies” as alternatives, while maybe obvious (and slightly humorous), seemed a little too simplistic, and so something else had to be thought of.

Given all of this, today’s poetry topic idea is: wings.

Dragonflies have interesting wings.  If you look at the photograph from the May 28, 2015 blog post A photograph to inspire poetry: Dragonfly, you can see that that dragonfly has four wings that appear mainly clear and have a lattice pattern to them.

Dragonflies can use their wings to fly in interesting ways.  They can hover and dart about and move somewhat like a hummingbird.

Some ideas that can from wings, are poems about:

  • Flight
  •  

  • Birds, bats and insects
  •  

  • The idea of freedom (flight being a way to have freedom)
  •  

  • Speed and quickness
  •  

  • Airplane dogfights
  •  

  • The structure of different kinds of wings

Post Series: The Dragonfly Series: Experimental Poetry Form: Dragonfly syllable stresses

Dragonfly is a three syllable word with a stress pattern of: high, low, medium.  This idea is used here to make an experimental poetry form.

The form is ten lines.  Each line has three syllables.  Those syllables follow the same stress pattern as dragonfly.  Ideally the poem should make sense as it flows.

Here is an example poem:

Bumblebee,

bumblebee,

  daffodils,

  marigolds,

  bluebonnets,

resonate,

eye-catching,

dragonfly,

metaphors,

everywhere.

Post Series: The Dragonfly Series: Poem: The dragon flies and the dragonflies

The dragon flies,
above in clouds,
that shimmer in the purple light.

The wings do glow,
as lightning strikes,
and they do beat with strengthened might.

And there the eyes,
look up in fear,
as hearts do race at just the sight.

And in the dread,
of what will be,
the forms below run from their plight.

But there the wings,
a thousand count,
do rise above to a great height.

And with one form,
the dragonflies,
move all as one and start to fight.

The flame bursts out,
and burns the sky,
as heat and light do fill the night.

But there they move,
with one great force,
and form a lance as of a knight.

And with the blow,
the dragon falls,
and hits the earth and turns dead white.

And then they fly,
as cheers are heard,
on to the left and to the right.

Milestone: Understanding: poems with explanations: 6 months

Today is six months since the self-publication of Understanding: poems with explanations by M. Sakran.

Understanding: poems with explanations by M. Sakran

As readers should know, Understanding: poems with explanations, is a self-published collection of twenty original poems, with explanations of each of them.  The main purpose of the book is to help readers expand their understanding of poetry through the explanations.

There have been many poems with explanations on this blog.  If you’ve liked them, and the general idea of having a poem explained, then please check out the book.

It is available as an eBook for a current price of $0.99 (plus tax where applicable).  (As a note, the eBook is also available in currencies other than the U. S. dollar.  It can be purchased with British Pounds, Euros (1, 2, 3, 4, 5), Japanese Yen, Brazilian Reals, Canadian Dollars, Mexican Pesos, Australian Dollars and Indian Rupees).

Currently, you can read the foreword, introduction, first poem, the explanation of the first poem, the second poem, and part of the explanation of the second poem all for free in the preview of the book.  Take a few minutes and take a look and see what you think.  Click here: Understanding.  If you like what you read, consider buying a copy.

For those out there who have already purchased a copy, please accept M. Sakran’s sincerest thanks.  Thank you very much.  Please consider reviewing the book and telling others what you thought about it.

P. S. The Post Series: The Dragonfly Series will continue tomorrow.

Post Series: The Dragonfly Series: Experimental Poetry Form: Dragonfly

There may be a traceable reason as to why dragonflies are called dragonflies.  There may be some noted origin of the term.  M. Sakran doesn’t actually know.

That being said, one hypothesis might be that dragonflies are large flying insects that are long and colorful.  One could imagine someone saying, “That colorful fly was as big as a dragon.”  A similar notion might be with horseflies (“That fly was as big as a horse.”).

Using this as an idea, there are two elements that can be drawn from dragonflies for the purpose of creating an experimental poetry form.  First, dragonflies are a large version of something small (they are big for something little).  Second, they fly.

With these two elements in mind, an experimental poetry form can be made.  It has the following elements:

Stanzas: 3

Lines per stanza: 3

Syllables per line: 12

Indention pattern:

  Stanza one:

    Line 1: no indent

    Line 2: indented 20 spaces

    Line 3: indented 10 spaces

  Stanza two:

    Line 1: indented 30 spaces

    Line 2: indented 20 spaces

    Line 3: indented 25 spaces

  Stanza three:

    Line 1: indented 50 spaces

    Line 2: indented 10 spaces

    Line 3: indented 20 spaces

Line breaks:

  1 between each stanza line

  2 between each stanza

 

The idea is that the stanzas are relatively small, with only three lines, but the lines within them are relatively long, with twelve syllables.  This reflects the idea that dragonflies are small and large at the same time.  Additionally, the varied indentions are meant to reflect the flying of the dragonfly.

The form looks like this:

Line

                    Line

          Line

 

                              Line

                    Line

                         Line

 

                                                  Line

          Line

                    Line

 

Post Series: The Dragonfly Series: Artwork to inspire poetry: Dragonfly

Dragonfly artwork

Here is the first of the items in The Dragonfly Series.  It is an artwork for inspiration.  It is of a dragonfly.  It is based off of the photograph to inspire poetry: Dragonfly from the May 28, 2015 post.  This artwork started out as a colored pencil drawing and then was computer altered.

Some poetry inspirations that might come from this artwork include poems relating dragonflies and:

  • light
  •  

  • water
  •  

  • moonlight
  •  

  • disappearance

Here is a poem inspired by the artwork:

upon the water
a glimmering reflection
the dragonfly flew

Post Series: The Dragonfly Series: Introduction

Today is the start of The Dragonfly Post Series.  Dragonflies are interesting little creatures by themselves, and are also interesting from metaphorical and symbolic perspectives.

This series will contain (not necessarily in this order):

4 Photographs for inspiration

2 Bilingual poems

2 Experimental poetry forms

2 Poetry topic ideas

2 Poems with explanations

1 Poem

1 Artwork for inspiration

The items in the series will start tomorrow and continue at least through April 12, 2017.  There will be an interruption of the series on Monday March 27, 2017 for a special post and if something comes up there may be either additions to posts or possibly interruptions.

So far on this blog, there have already been a few posts that reference dragonflies.  They include (at least):

Artwork to inspire poetry: dragonfly from March 20, 2017,

Poetry topic idea: Dragonflies from July 20, 2015,

A photograph to inspire poetry: Dragonfly from May 28, 2015,

Poem with an explanation: Searching from May 5, 2015, and

Post Series: The Orange Series: Experimental Poetry Form: Orange from September 5, 2014.

Please enjoy the series