Poem with an explanation: Sitting down

Sitting down,
on the tomb like stone,
all is blurry,
in the singularity,
after a moment,
the summer solstice,
appearing in March,
a tornado,
from the hurricane,
to those in the stands,
it either makes sense,
or is foolishness,
but there,
on the tomb like stone,
all is blurry,
in the singularity.

Above is a poem.  Below is its explanation.  Before you read the explanation though, take a moment, and think about what you think the poem means.  Then, as you read the explanation, you can see how your interpretation of the poem compares with the intended meaning of the poem.

Did you think it meant something different?

Did you think it meant the same thing?

Were you surprised?

Was it what you expected?

If you find this exercise to be insightful in some way, the idea of comparing what you thought a poem meant compared to what the poet intended it to mean, you might consider writing a post for your blog about it.  You can link to this post if you want.  Please let M. Sakran know if you do, by using the Contact page.  Maybe you found some insight about how you read poems, or about the idea of intended meaning vs. interpreted meaning, or something else, that you thought might be good to share with your readers.  If so, consider sharing it with your readers.

If you like poems with explanations in general, you might consider purchasing a copy of M. Sakran’s self-published eBook, Understanding: poems with explanations, which contains twenty poems and explanations of those poems.

Here is the explanation of the poem:

This is a poem about a person whose pet has died in front of them.  The pet died of some illness.

The poem starts after the pet’s death.  The person is sitting down on the concrete (on the tomb like stone) beside their pet.  The concrete is tomb like because of the pet’s death.

The person is crying (all is blurry) and the moment they are having is intensely focused (in the singularity).  The person pauses (after a moment) and certain thoughts come to their mind.

The first idea is two expressions of the notion that death is completely expected, but still hits like a surprise.  Two metaphors for this are given.  The first is the summer solstice, appearing in March.  The summer solstice is a completely predictable event.  Even down to the minute for a given location.  Yet, in the poem, it comes early, at an unexpected time.  The summer solstice was used as a metaphor for death, because it is the longest day of the year.  Each day after that, until the winter solstice, gets darker and darker.  It is a metaphor for how the person feels.

The second metaphor shows the idea of something unpredictable, a tornado, from something predicable, a hurricane.  The idea here is that a hurricane is big and ominous, but can be tracked with some predictability.  This is like the general idea of death.  A tornado though is often a complete surprise.  This is like the idea of a specific death.  There is a difference between the general idea of something, and the specific instance of it happening.

After this, the person feels a moment of self-consciousness.  They imagine people seeing them on the ground crying (to those in the stands).  They either think that these people will understand the sadness and significance of their emotions (it either makes sense) or that the people will look at them like they are foolish for crying about a dog (or is foolishness).

This brief moment of self-consciousness ends though as the person comes back to their situation.  They stop thinking and just feel where they are.  They go back to how they started, on the concrete (on the tomb like stone), crying (all is blurry) and in an intensely focused moment (in the singularity).

In terms of form, some elements are:

Lines two, three and four are repeated as lines fourteen, fifteen and sixteen.

All lines are between two and five words long.

Seven of the sixteen lines, end in a word, starting with ‘s’.

 

Hopefully you enjoyed this poem with an explanation.

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