Poem with an explanation: 1320

1320
the statue crumbles

across the desert
in the distance
nothing is seen

the car rolls
on square tires
1320

before the gate
316800
floats in the mind

the pieces of stone
are in a pile
of 1320 pieces

 

This poem is about a person who is not physically fit, trying to become so.  On their first day of exercise they decide to jog.

In the first stanza of the poem, the person jogs a quarter of a mile.  A quarter of a mile is 1320 feet.  This is too much for the person and they become spent (the statue crumbles).

The person is very tired after this short distance.  They decide that they should go back home.  In the second stanza, they look back at the distance they have to go.

Although before they jogged, they thought a quarter of a mile was a short distance to traverse, now it seems very far.  They feel like they are looking out over a desert and are unable to see their destination.

In the third stanza, the person starts to walk home.  They are experiencing physical discomfort after the jog and they have trouble walking.  They move slowly like a car with square tires.  They feel all of the quarter mile.

In the fourth stanza, the person is home.  As they stand by their front door, they gain a new perspective on distance.  They think of 60 mph, which is the speed a car might travel.  This is 316800 feet an hour.  They think of this distance, and how it feels like nothing, and how the 1320 feet of the quarter mile feels like a lot.

In the last stanza, the person sits down on the floor of their house in the air conditioning.  They are tired after the jog.  The distance has become part of them.

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