A Milestone: 800th blog post

This is the 800th blog post on M. Sakran’s blog of and about poetry and poetry related things.  The first post was on April 24, 2014.

800 posts is a lot.  It feels like a lot.

There has been a lot on this blog.  There have been poems, poems with explanations, poetry topic ideas, experimental poetry forms, artwork to inspire poetry, photographs to inspire poetry and bilingual poems among other things.  There’s often a sense with each post to have something a little different from what has been there before.  Hopefully there was a sense of having something at least a little new with each post.

There is hope that everyone who has read something on this blog has enjoyed it.  Hopefully you were entertained or thought or were inspired or learned something.  Hopefully something was gained from it.

Thinking back on the posts, it’s hard to say what it all adds up to.  800 posts is a lot to think back on.  There is a sense, that there is something in the totality of it all, as if it were a novel or something, but whatever that something is, it’s hard to describe.

Thank you to anyone who has in any way interacted with this blog.

If you’d like to show your support for the blog, please consider purchasing a copy of the eBook, Understanding: poems with explanations.

As a side note, there is a new set of photography, artwork, poetry and fiction on MSakran.com.  The short story in the set examines an interesting philosophical idea: What would it be like to communicate with an entity, if you couldn’t be certain if that entity was a person or a computer?  The idea could be used to inspire poetry.

Again, thank you to everyone who’s interacted with this blog.

Poetry topic idea: transition of roles

Today’s poetry topic idea is about the transition of roles.  Think of the transition from being a student to a teacher, or an interviewee to an interviewer, or a child to a parent.  There are many instances in life when people are in one role in a type of situation, and later on, they are in the opposite role.  The idea of the poetry topic idea is to examine the different roles and the relationship between them.  A poet could write about:

  • Transitioning from one role to another (e.g. the poet could write about being a student in a class and then, at some later time, being a teacher in a class)
  •  

  • The perspective of on role of another (e.g. a poet could write about how an interviewee (the one getting interviewed) views an interviewer (the one interviewing))
  •  

  • The reflection of someone in a later role on what someone in the previous role is feeling (e.g. a poet could write about how a parent views their child from the perspective of how they themselves were as a child and how this reflection informs how they feel)
  •  

  • A detachment of the someone in a later role to someone in a previous role (e.g. a poet could write about a teacher who has forgotten what it was like to be a student and does things that students in the class don’t like, that they themselves wouldn’t have liked, such as giving an assignment over a break period)

Poem with an explanation: A dark celebration

There are celebrations,
celebrations on the mountain peak,
of the glowing warmth,
and dances in the wildflower fields.

But this is false,
for there behind the mountain peak,
the wings of dread do spread,
and the flight of darkness soars.

But in the fields,
all is joy,
as butterflies fly,
from bloom to bloom.

But the edges darken,
from red to black,
and the swallowing of all,
begins.

It all seems joy,
as arms twirl about,
and all the warm,
fills the land.

But tears do fall,
from knowing eyes,
for they do know,
the fire dims.

The cheers of joy,
for what is high,
not seeing that,
today it falls.

 

This poem is about the summer solstice.  It might depend on where a person lives, but the summer solstice could start late tonight.  Tomorrow, will be the longest day of the year, in terms of sunlight.

The longest day of the year is often celebrated because it has the most light of any day of the year.  This poem takes a different perspective and looks at it as a day of dread.

It is a day of dread, because from this point on, until the winter solstice, every day will get shorter.  Since this is the peak, it is the start of the fall.  This day is the last day when light grows, and because of this, the poem takes the perspective that it is a day to be feared, rather than celebrated.

The poem alternates between celebration and dread.  The first stanza is one of celebration.  It describes the celebration of the longest day (the mountain peak), of all the sunshine (the glowing warmth) and talks of the celebration of nature (dances in the wildflower fields).

The next stanza starts the dread.  It uses a metaphor of a dragon.  It says that the celebrating is for something false.  It says that after the longest day (behind the mountain peak), something ominous is coming (the wings of dread do spread) and this ominous thing is the increasing darkness from this point until the winter solstice (the flight of darkness soars).

In the next stanza, there is an unawareness of this.  It is as if the people celebrating in the field, don’t see the shadow rise behind the mountain.  The stanza talks of joy, butterflies and blooms.

The following stanza goes back to the ominous idea.  It uses the imagery of darkness swallowing all.  Like a cloud of darkness starting at the horizons and covering the land.  It uses the image of “red to black” to play off the idea of a sunset.

In the field though, there is an unawareness.  The celebrations continue as people bask in the sunshine and dance about.

This is contrasted in the next stanza by a sense of sadness by those that know that a peak leads to a fall.  It is as if all are celebrating the fire at its highest, but there are some that know that the highest point means that it gets lower after that.

The last stanza puts the ideas together and says that the peak is celebrated, but that is because it isn’t seen as the start of the fall.

This poem consists of seven stanzas.  Each stanza is four lines long.  The first six stanzas alternate between happiness and dread.  The last stanza has both ideas together.

P. S. Did you enjoy this poem with an explanation? Did you know that M. Sakran has a self-published eBook of poems with explanations?  You can learn more about the book and purchase a copy from here: Understanding: poems with explanations.

Bilingual Poem: lifeboat

Out in the ocean,
floating with an empty soda bottle under each arm,
there in the distance,
after five years,
a lifeboat

 

a storm came,
the lifeboat sank.

 

Afuera en el océano,
flotando con un envase de soda debajo cada brazo,
ahí en la distancia,
después de cinco años,
un bote salvavidas

 

una tormenta vino,
un bote salvavidas hundió.

Poem: construction worker

There,
by the side of the house,
the shirt soaked through with sweat,
fiberglass insulation pricking the skin,
a smear of mud on the face,
sawdust in the hair,
cuts on the hands,
burst open blisters,
dirt under the fingernails,
dirt stains on the pants,
something in the eyes,
the sun blazing,
coughing from the dust,
with swollen feet,
from seven am,
until past seven.