Unter Commemoration August 7, 2020

gone for three weeks now
although it seems like it hasn’t been that long
remembering how you were
doing things in your silly way
each thought can bring a smile
nice memories of you
inside though still some sorrow
at the thought of you being gone

 

This poem is an acrostic poem of the word gardenia.  Unter liked to sit under gardenia plants.

Experimental Poetry Form: complex

Yesterday’s experimental poetry form was basic.  This one is complex.  It has a number of elements.  They include: stanzas, lines per stanza, rhyming pattern in each stanza, meter in each stanza, metrical feet in each line of each stanza, indentions of each line in each stanza, and acrostic pattern in each stanza.

Here are the details:

Stanzas: 4

Lines per stanza:

  Stanza one: 3

  Stanza two: 4

  Stanza three: 2

  Stanza four: 5

Rhyming pattern in each stanza:

  Stanza one: lines 1 and 3

  Stanza two: lines 3 and 4

  Stanza three: lines 1 and 2

  Stanza four: lines 1, 3, and 5

Meter in each stanza:

  Stanza one: iambic

  Stanza two: trochaic

  Stanza three: anapestic

  Stanza four: iambic

Metrical feet in each line of each stanza:

  Stanza one: 3

  Stanza two: 4

  Stanza three: 3

  Stanza four: 5

Indentions of each line in each stanza:

  Stanza one:

    Line 1: 0

    Line 2: 2

    Line 3: 4

  Stanza two:

    Line 1: 1

    Line 2: 3

    Line 3: 2

    Line 4: 4

  Stanza three:

    Line 1: 5

    Line 2: 5

  Stanza four:

    Line 1: 0

    Line 2: 2

    Line 3: 2

    Line 4: 1

    Line 5: 4

Acrostic pattern in each stanza:

  Stanza one: NOW

  Stanza two: LOOK

  Stanza three: AT

  Stanza four: WORDS

 

Below is what the form looks like.  The *s represent short syllables, the /s represent long syllables, the Rs followed by a letter (a, b, c, d) represent rhyming groups, and the letters at the end of lines show the acrostic pattern.

 

*/ */ */ Ra  N
  */ */ */  O
    */ */ */ Ra  W

 /* /* /* /*  L
   /* /* /* /*  O
  /* /* /* /* Rb  O
    /* /* /* /* Rb  K

     **/ **/ **/ Rc  A
     **/ **/ **/ Rc  T

*/ */ */ */ */ Rd  W
  */ */ */ */ */  O
  */ */ */ */ */ Rd  R
 */ */ */ */ */  D
    */ */ */ */ */ Rd  S

Experimental Poetry Form: jack, queen, king

Today’s experimental poetry form is called jack, queen, king.  It is based off of the cards of those names in a deck of cards.

The form is an acrostic form with three stanzas.  The first stanza is an acrostic form for “jack”.  The second stanza is an acrostic form for “queen”.  The third stanza is an acrostic form for “king”.

In the first stanza, each line has eleven syllables, because a jack has a value of eleven.  In the second stanza, each line has twelve syllables, because a queen has a value of twelve.  In the third stanza, each line has thirteen syllables because a king has a value of thirteen.

The form also includes a rhyming pattern.  Lines 2, 6, 7, 8, and 11 rhyme.  Lines 1, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 12, and 13 rhyme.  The idea here is that lines that start with a vowel rhyme and lines that start with a consonant rhyme.

Here are the elements of the form:

J – 11 syllables, Rhyme A
A – 11 syllables, Rhyme B
C – 11 syllables, Rhyme A
K – 11 syllables, Rhyme A

Q – 12 syllables, Rhyme A
U – 12 syllables, Rhyme B
E – 12 syllables, Rhyme B
E – 12 syllables, Rhyme B
N – 12 syllables, Rhyme A

K – 13 syllables, Rhyme A
I – 13 syllables, Rhyme B
N – 13 syllables, Rhyme A
G – 13 syllables, Rhyme A

Here is an example poem using the form:

Jumping into the air with the ball in hand,
all hold their breath as the seconds tick on down,
climbing into the air as all around stand,
knowing if made that all will cheer in the land.

Quickly throwing the ball as all bases were manned,
understanding the meaning as the coach did frown,
ending the game would cause a party in the town,
expecting the umpire to say that one noun,
not knowing what would happen for nothing was planned.

Kicking the round ball with help from the adrenal gland,
into the net not thinking of the past patient gown,
not thinking too of the leg that was no longer tanned,
getting the final goal as all the cameras panned.

Experimental Poetry Form: Three stanzas

This experimental poetry form is called three stanzas.  As the name implies, it consists of three stanzas.  Here are the other qualities:

Stanza one has four lines, stanza two has five, and stanza three has three.

Stanza one is not indented, stanza two has each line indented five spaces, and stanza three has each line indented three spaces.

Stanza one has four syllable lines, stanza two has six syllable lines, and stanza three has five syllable lines.

Each stanza is an acrostic stanza for a different word.

Here is what the form looks like:

****
****………………Word one acrostic
****
****

     ******
     ******………..Word two acrostic
     ******
     ******
     ******

   *****
   *****…………..Word three acrostic
   *****

Here is an example poem written in the form

What is that noise,
heard in the dark,
amongst shadows,
this quiet night?

     Certainly just a dream,
     of fears and dreads of dark,
     made of glimpses and sounds,
     entirely of fog,
     silently in shadows.

   Not falling backward,
   over the cliff’s edge,
   where fear reaches out.

 

P. S. Happy fifth day of Christmas.

 

P. S. S. As Monday is New Year’s Day, there will be no new blog post on the blog that day. Happy New Year.

Experimental Poetry Form: firefly

Today’s experimental poetry form is called firefly.  It has the following characteristics:

It is one line long.

The line consists of seven words (there are seven letters in firefly).

Each word is two syllables long (although there are probably different thoughts on this, firefly could be considered a two syllable word).

The poem is an acrostic for firefly.

 

Here is an example poem:

Fighting intense regrets, empties flowing letters yearly.

Experimental Poetry Form: Acrostic colors

This experimental poetry form is called acrostic colors.  It is simple in idea, and depending on the subject of the poem, could make a good presentation.

The poem has three lines, each separated by a line break.  The first line, is an acrostic of the word “blue”, the second is an acrostic of the word “orange”, and the third is an acrostic of the word “red”.  Additionally, the text of the blue line is colored blue, the text of the orange line is colored orange, and the text of the red line is colored red.

Here is an example poem to illustrate the idea:

Blowing lightly under eves,

outside rain almost nears glass enclosures,

remaining encased defends.

Poem with an explanation: October

Outside things start to change,
colors change in minute ways,
the sun has less time for its rays,
outside things start to change,
birds leave over the days,
emerging blooms of wildflowers come out on the range,
redness grows as evergreen green stays.

 

The poem above is an acrostic poem of “October”.  The idea was selected because today is October first.  The poem has a form that is similar to other poems of this type that have been on this blog.  The letters in “October” that repeat, the “o’s”, are repeating lines in the poem.  The lines that start with vowels (the first, fourth, and sixth), rhyme with each other.  The lines that start with consonants (the second, third, fifth, and seventh) rhyme with each other.  The idea of the poem was to describe the beginning of fall.

Poem Series: Experimental Poetry Forms: Acrostic matching and rhyming: Day after equinox

Dawn began with light so gold,
a morning of change was here,
yet though the day was not old,
a morning of change was here.

For though today we are so told,
“The days of past have lost their hold,”
expecting change that we can see,
 red and yellow colors so bold,
expecting change that we can see,
quietly we stand in air not cold,
understanding the words that we were sold,
in expectation of a different mold,
outside we stand as sounds are polled,
xylophone notes familiarly rolled.

 

(37/40) Experimental Poetry Form: Acrostic matching and rhyming