Experimental Poetry Form: pennies, nickels, and a dime

Today’s experimental poetry form is called pennies, nickels, and a dime.

Five pennies are equivalent to one nickel and two nickels are equivalent to one dime.  This idea is the basis of the form.

The form has four stanzas.

The first stanza is the penny stanza.  It has five lines.  Each line has one syllable.

The second stanza is the nickel stanza.  It has one line.  That one line has five syllables.

The third stanza is the two nickel stanza.  It has two lines.  Each line has five syllables.

The fourth stanza is the dime stanza.  It has one line.  That one line has ten syllables.

The idea is that the stanzas are related the same way the coins are related.

Here is an example poem:

Some
nights
it’s
so
still.

Sitting by the bed,

in the hospital,
watching the lights glow.

They might look pretty but for the reason.

Experimental Poetry Form: Ten

This experimental poetry form is called ten.  It has the following elements:

Stanzas: 1

Lines per stanza: 10

Letters per line: 10

Acrostic pattern: ATENTENTEN

 

This form might be a little difficult in the sense of combining the acrostic pattern with the letter count and having the poem flow and make sense, but, since the only other restriction is that there is one stanza (the restriction of the number of lines per stanza is contained in the acrostic pattern), it should not be too difficult to use.  Here is an example poem:

A dime’s here,
timid and so …
eventually,
not talking,
to quarters,
especially,
not that one,
the one here,
even though,
not one sees.