Poem with an explanation: Don’t ever go

Hello.

Is it play time?

Time for a walk?

Hey, what’s that?

What’s this thing?

Is this moving?

Where’s home?

Hello.

Hello.

This is bad.

This is bad.

What’s this place?

This doesn’t look good.

This is that place, isn’t it?

Noooooooooooo.

Why this place?

Why?

Was it the shoes?

The noise?

Something?

It’ll change.

It will.

Home is good.

Home.

Home.

Home.

Is it time to go?

No, that’s the wrong way!

This is bad.

This is bad.

Who’s that?

Ahhhhhh!

That was bad.

Who’s that?

What are they doing?

Ahhhhhh!

Ahhhhhh!

This is bad.

This is bad.

You’re not nice.

You’re not nice.

Is it time to go?

Leaving?

Yea!!!

Hurry.

Into the thing.

It’s moving.

It’s moving.

What’s that?

Home?

Home?

Home!!!

Home!!!

Yea!!!

Hello.

Hello.

It was horrible.

Horrible!

Don’t ever go.

Don’t ever go.

 

This poem follows the thoughts of a dog during a trip to the veterinarian.  The dog is simplistic in how he views things and sees things from an emotional level.  Things are either good or bad.

Although the poem is about a dog, it can be viewed as a metaphor for the human experience with medical care.  The human experience in medical care can be one of uncertainty, fear, and feeling that things are happening to you.  The dog’s experience reflects this.

The poem starts with the dog greeting his owner (Hello.)  The dog questions why his owner is there (Is it play time? Time for a walk?)

The dog has a harness put on and is taken to a car.  When he sees it, he doesn’t know what it is (Hey, what’s that?).  When he gets inside, he questions it further (What’s this thing?).

As the car starts to move, the dog questions what is happening (Is this moving?).  He wants to go back to where he was happy.  He wants to go back home.  He expresses this through a question (Where’s home?).

The dog feels a sense of abandonment from his owner.  He says Hello twice to his owner hoping to get some sort of comfort.  When he does not, he feels the negativity of his situation (This is bad.  This is bad.).

When they arrive at the vet, the dog questions where they are (What’s this place?).  The smell of the place fills the dog with foreboding (This doesn’t look good.)  The dog realizes where it is and questions it (This is that place, isn’t it?).  The realization fills the dog with despair (Noooooooooooo.)

The dog wonders if he is being punished (Why this place? Why?)  He questions if it is because he chewed shoes (Was it the shoes?), barked (The noise?), or anything else (Something?).

Fearing the place, and hoping for reprieve, the dog promises to change (It’ll change.  It will.)

The dog doesn’t like where he is.  He thinks of his happy place (Home is good.)  While he waits, he keeps thinking of it (Home.  Home.  Home.)

The dog and owner are then called into the examination room.  As his owner gets up, the dog think’s it is getting relief (Is it time to go?).  As the dog is lead further into the office, he realizes he isn’t going home (No, that’s the wrong way!)

When the dog goes in the office he is very scared (This is bad.  This is bad.  This is bad.)

The veterinary assistant comes in.  The dog question who it is (Who’s that?).  The assistant takes the dog’s temperature, which the dog does not like (Ahhhhhh!  That was bad.)

The veterinarian then comes in.  The dog again questions who it is (Who’s that?)  The vet then checks the dog over, which the dog doesn’t like (What are they doing?)

The vet then gives the dog two vaccinations.  Both fill the dog with pain (Ahhhhhh!  Ahhhhhh!).

The dog doesn’t like where he is (This is bad.  This is bad.)  He feels a sense of betrayal from his owner (You’re not nice.  You’re not nice.)

At this point, the dog’s owner gets up to leave with him (Is it time to go?).  The dog, in disbelief, questions if they are leaving (Leaving?)

When the dog realizes they are, he cheers (Yea!!!).  He wants his owner to hurry (Hurry.) and get into the car (Into the thing.)

As they drive away, the dog is filled with glee and it cheers (It’s moving.  It’s moving.)

As they go, the dog recognizes the area as familiar (What’s that?)  He thinks they are getting near home (Home?  Home?).  When he sees his home he cheers (Home!!! Home!!! Yea!!!).

When the dog arrives home, he greats another dog that lives with him (Hello.  Hello.)  He tells the dog of his experience (It was horrible.  Horrible!) and warns the dog to never go (Don’t ever go.  Don’t ever go.)

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Poetry essay: Imparting emotion to poetry

In writing poetry, there may be times when a poet wants to impart emotion to their words.

It could be, that the topic they are writing about is personal to themselves.  Maybe they or someone they are close to has experienced something that they are trying to express.  This topic might be one the poet feels connected to and strongly about and they want to express that emotion in their writing.

Alternatively, a poet could be writing about something that they don’t have a connection to.  A poet, for example, might be writing about a social issue.  They may have no direct connection to the topic themselves, but they still want to impart emotion for the reader.

As another alternative, a poet may be writing a fictional poem or one with fictional elements.  In the poem, a character might be experiencing an emotion.  This might have nothing to do with the poet personally and may not be connected to a societal issue.  It might just be an emotion the character is experiencing in their own circumstances.  As the poet writes, they might work to have this emotion come through for the reader.

There are a number of ways that a poet can have emotion come through in their writing.

Details

One way a poet can increase the emotion of their writing is to include details.  When a poet includes details regarding a situation, it can add authenticity and help relay the experience.

For example, if a poet was writing about cancer treatment, they could increase the emotion of the poem if they wrote about things like a chemotherapy pump or having a chest port.  Having these details, and expressing what they are like, can add inherit emotion to a poem.

Play acting

If a poet is writing a poem that could be read as dialogue, one way to increase the emotion is to play act the part.  For example, if a poet were writing what it was like for someone to explain how their spouse died, and how they are a widow or widower, they might try to act it out.  They might try to actually say the part and act as if they were explaining to someone how their spouse died.  They could try to feel the emotion of their words and say them in a realistic way.  They could then write what they said.  This would help impart emotion to their writing.

Actually feeling the emotion

If a poet is actually experiencing an emotion, this can help them when writing about it.  If a poet is actually feeling joy, for example, then this can help them express joy in their writing.  They can write what joyfulness is like, because they are joyful.

Fewer words and setting apart impact lines

One way to have more emotion in a poem is to have fewer words and to have lines of impact set apart.  Sometimes brief is best when describing an emotion.  Sometimes the less that is written, the better.  In these instances, if the emotional impact is set apart, this can increase the emotion by having a pause and by letting the emotional aspect stand alone.

Careful word choice and order

In line with the idea of fewer words and using impact lines, a poet should also focus on careful word choice and the order of their words when they are trying to impart emotion.  Because of the experiential nature of emotions, the exact words used and the order of them can have an effect on the experience.  Think of experiences that are contained moments.  An example might be a man proposing to a woman, or a man and a woman telling one of their sets of parents that they are having a baby.  Because of the significance of these moments and the fact that they happen at a specific time and place, the way the words are said can be very important.  In a sense, there is only one chance to have the moment.  This can make word choice and order very important.  The same idea, in a sense, applies to emotional poetry.

Overt metaphor and symbolism

Another way to impart emotion through poetry is through the use of metaphor and symbolism.  Rather than having obscure ideas, to impart emotions the uses should be overt.  A reader should be able to understand what the metaphor is referring to and what the symbolism represents.  The idea is for the reader to realize they are reading metaphor and symbolism and to have that realization impart increased effect to the emotion imparted.

An example might be a poem where someone dies as a flower loses its petals.  The waning of the person’s life is overtly represented by the flower losing its petals.  This helps the idea of the flower to impart increased emotion to the idea of the person’s death.

Poem Series: Experimental Poetry Forms: Brewed Tea: Feeling

On the way to the vet,
she trembled and shook,
with each breath the dog took.

Her hands shivered,
as the small Roly-Poly,
curled up slowly.

A fog of condolence,
shadowed the candle of reprieve,
but a firefly did believe.
 

(12/40) Experimental Poetry Form: Brewed Tea

 

P.S. Today on MSakran.com, there is a new set of photography, artwork, poetry and fiction.