Experimental Poetry Form: two, three, four

This experimental poetry form is called two, three, four.  It is based off of the number of letters in words.

The form has one stanza with three lines.  Each line has three words.  The first word in each line has two letters, the second word in each line has three letters, and the third word in each line has four letters.  Here is what the form looks like with *’s representing letters:

** *** ****
** *** ****
** *** ****

Here is an example poem:

As fog came,
so did fear,
to the mind.

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Poem with an explanation: closing a medicine cabinet door

Who knew,
closing a medicine cabinet door,
could be so horrifying?

 

In some horror movies there is a sight effect that is shown.  In the effect a character is looking at a mirror that is on a door.  They see themselves and the background behind them.  Everything looks normal.  The character then opens the door, does something, and closes it.  When the character closes the door, they see something horrifying in the mirror.  It might be something behind them or it might be a change in how they appear.

This effect is the idea of the poem above.  In the poem, a person is reflecting on an experience.

The person in the poem just saw a horror movie with the effect mentioned.  After it is done, they go to the bathroom.  While there, they open a mirrored medicine cabinet door.  Then they remember the scene from the movie.

All of a sudden they become afraid.  They all of a sudden feel something behind them.  They all of a sudden have the sense that something ominous is about the happen.

In this moment, a simple act, closing a medicine cabinet door, has become frightening.  Something that was a thoughtless act, now has an immense amount of thought with it.  The person very much feels a moment they otherwise would not have noticed.

This basic idea – that of being scared of something that normally isn’t scary because of some experience – is something that can be applied to a number of situations.  In this case, the previous experience was based on fiction.  A poem could be written though where a previous experience was real.  For example, a person may have shocked themselves when they plugged something into an outlet.  The next time they plug something in, they might pause with fear.  The person would feel fear at what normally isn’t a frightening situation.

Experimental Poetry Form: Three stanzas

This experimental poetry form is called three stanzas.  As the name implies, it consists of three stanzas.  Here are the other qualities:

Stanza one has four lines, stanza two has five, and stanza three has three.

Stanza one is not indented, stanza two has each line indented five spaces, and stanza three has each line indented three spaces.

Stanza one has four syllable lines, stanza two has six syllable lines, and stanza three has five syllable lines.

Each stanza is an acrostic stanza for a different word.

Here is what the form looks like:

****
****………………Word one acrostic
****
****

     ******
     ******………..Word two acrostic
     ******
     ******
     ******

   *****
   *****…………..Word three acrostic
   *****

Here is an example poem written in the form

What is that noise,
heard in the dark,
amongst shadows,
this quiet night?

     Certainly just a dream,
     of fears and dreads of dark,
     made of glimpses and sounds,
     entirely of fog,
     silently in shadows.

   Not falling backward,
   over the cliff’s edge,
   where fear reaches out.

 

P. S. Happy fifth day of Christmas.

 

P. S. S. As Monday is New Year’s Day, there will be no new blog post on the blog that day. Happy New Year.

Poem with an explanation: the darkness of irrationality

The darkness of irrationality,
in the twilight of sensibility,
the sounds and glimpses,
transform and grow,
and there in the shadows,
where the metal turns,
translucent forms,
hide in the fog.

 

This poem is about someone being afraid.  They are home alone, at night, and a sense of fear comes over them.

The first line, The darkness of irrationality, shows that the person’s fear isn’t founded on anything specific.  They have a fear that there is someone outside their home who wants to come inside and do them harm.  The person though, isn’t afraid of someone they know, or someone nearby, or something they heard in the news.  They are simply afraid.  They have a fear of what might or could be.

The second line, in the twilight of sensibility, is meant to contrast with the first.  While the person’s general fear is irrational, the idea of their fear isn’t.  There could be someone outside.  There is the real possibility of a home invasion or some other kind of harm.  There is a sense of sensibility in the person being aware and cautious of the possibility.  The person though, goes to the level of irrationality in the sense that they are continuously afraid of the idea.

The first line and the second line are meant to show a contrast through their form.  Both lines are ten syllables long.  The first line has darkness, while the second has twilight.  The first line has irrationality, while the second has sensibility.  The equal lengths paired with the opposite words shows the contrast of the ideas.

The third line, the sounds and glimpses, describes the audial and visual things that increase the person’s fear.  The person hears many noises.  Their heater makes a noise.  Their refrigerator makes a noise.  The house creaks.  They also see things like reflections or things out of the corner of their eye.  These things are interpreted by the person as signs of what they fear.  They believe each noise is someone outside and each sight might be someone inside.

The fourth line, transform and grow, refers to the sounds and glimpses of the third line.  As the person grows more afraid, the idea of what could be causing the sounds and glimpses grows.  The person becomes more afraid with each instance.

The fifth and sixth lines, and there in the shadows, where the metal turns, describes the unseen places of the person’s house.  They imagine that there is someone outside of these places trying to get in.  This “getting in” is described as a lock turning or, where the metal turns.  They have the horror movie image of a lock slowly turning, in their mind.

The eighth line, translucent forms, describes who the person is afraid of.  It is a vague image of a person.  It is what they imagine an intruder would look like.  It is a composite of criminal images they have seen.  The image is vague and not defined because the person is afraid of an idea more than of an actual person.  The vagueness is shown through the idea of the forms being translucent.

The last line, hide in the fog, shows that, partially, the person is afraid of the unknown.  They are afraid of what they can’t see outside.  Also, it shows the confusion of their fear.

This poem is about a person afraid alone at night in their house.  The idea of it is to describe, in some sense, the haziness of the person’s fear.  The person is afraid, but their fear, in some sense, isn’t based on anything substantial.  The person is mainly afraid of the possibility of something.  They, in some sense, want to be on guard for it.

The poem isn’t meant to criticize the person for their fear.  Describing the fear as irrational isn’t meant to imply that the person is.  The idea of the poem is meant to describe how an irrational fear can grow, even in a rational person, under certain conditions.

P. S. Do you like poems with explanations? Did you know that M. Sakran has an eBook of them?  It is true.  You can learn more about the eBook and purchase a copy from here: Understanding: poems with explanations.

Experimental Poetry Form: rhyming with syllable count for the rhyming words

This experimental poetry form focuses on rhyming, with the added feature of syllable count for the rhyming words.  Here are the specifics of the form:

One stanza

Six lines

Five words per line

Lines 1 and 4 rhyme

Lines 2 and 5 rhyme

Lines 3 and 6 rhyme

Lines 1 and 4 each end with a one syllable word

Lines 2 and 5 each end with a two syllable word

Lines 3 and 6 each end with a three syllable word

 

Here is an example poem to illustrate the form:

Radio play

There alone on the chair,
sitting by the radio seeing,
the man hiding there silently,
and imagining his cold glare,
knowing he’s a fictional being,
yet still running off violently.

Experimental Poetry Form: 7-6-5

This experimental poetry form is called 7-6-5.  It has:

7 lines

6 iambic feet per line

5 spaces of indention on the even lines

The form looks as follows:

** ** ** ** ** **
     ** ** ** ** ** **
** ** ** ** ** **
     ** ** ** ** ** **
** ** ** ** ** **
     ** ** ** ** ** **
** ** ** ** ** **

The form is somewhat long, both in terms of line length (with twelve syllables per line) and in total length, and the idea is to see how this effects the expression and also how it interacts with the longer indentions.  Here is an example poem:

Medical result

Between the pain and what awaits the day moves slow,
     as eyes and heart do race and jump about the soul,
and will and thought do seek a cave where thoughts move by,
     and flame and wind and all the hail can’t fall or be.
The time will strike and clouds will flash as eyes are blind,
     and in a word the house will fall or stay as is,
and all the world that lives inside will shake and fall.

Poem: There’s a feeling

There’s a feeling,
waking up,
in the middle of the night,
and being filled with terror,
at something so harsh,
and then realizing,
that it was a dream,
and feeling that calm,
and relief,
and peace.

 

There’s also a feeling,
waking up,
in the middle of the night,
and being filled with terror,
at something so harsh,
and then realizing,
that it isn’t a dream,
and feeling that chaos,
and dread,
and fear.