Experimental Poetry Form: Four stanzas with a repeated moving line

This experimental poetry form consists of four stanzas.  Each stanza is four lines.  Each line has ten syllables.  There is one line that is repeated.  It is the first line of the first stanza, the second line of the second stanza, the third line of the third stanza, and the fourth line of the fourth stanza.  The form looks as follows, with the repeated line noted as “R”

R
*
*
*

*
R
*
*

*
*
R
*

*
*
*
R

 

Here is an example poem written in the form:

while ribs are smoking outside in the rain
a small clock is watched and hours counted
classic rock is playing songs that you know
iced tea is sipped under an overhang

images of history float up high
while ribs are smoking outside in the rain
generations of learning of fire
generations of learning of life

silently, neighbors peer out their front doors
wondering what is that scent in the air
while ribs are smoking outside in the rain
and thinking they should walk over and see

it’s been too long since days like this were here
with quiet thoughts and peaceful sounds of life
and scents rising slowly up in the air
while ribs are smoking outside in the rain

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Experimental Poetry Form: Three stanzas

This experimental poetry form is called three stanzas.  As the name implies, it consists of three stanzas.  Here are the other qualities:

Stanza one has four lines, stanza two has five, and stanza three has three.

Stanza one is not indented, stanza two has each line indented five spaces, and stanza three has each line indented three spaces.

Stanza one has four syllable lines, stanza two has six syllable lines, and stanza three has five syllable lines.

Each stanza is an acrostic stanza for a different word.

Here is what the form looks like:

****
****………………Word one acrostic
****
****

     ******
     ******………..Word two acrostic
     ******
     ******
     ******

   *****
   *****…………..Word three acrostic
   *****

Here is an example poem written in the form

What is that noise,
heard in the dark,
amongst shadows,
this quiet night?

     Certainly just a dream,
     of fears and dreads of dark,
     made of glimpses and sounds,
     entirely of fog,
     silently in shadows.

   Not falling backward,
   over the cliff’s edge,
   where fear reaches out.

 

P. S. Happy fifth day of Christmas.

 

P. S. S. As Monday is New Year’s Day, there will be no new blog post on the blog that day. Happy New Year.

Experimental Poetry Form: line breaks and indentations

This experimental poetry form consists of line breaks and indentations.  The structure looks as follows:

*

 

     *

*

*

          *

 

*

   *

 

There are seven lines.  The first line is not indented.  Then there is a line break.  Then there is the second line on the following line.  The second line is indented five spaces.

On the line after the second line, is the third line.  On the line after that is the fourth.  Neither is indented.

On the next line, is the fifth line.  It is indented ten spaces.

After that there is a line break.  On the line after the line break is the sixth line.  It is not indented.

On the line after the sixth line, is the seventh line.  It is indented three spaces.

All of the lines of the poem are, in the structure of writing a document, separate paragraphs, as opposed to lines within a paragraph.

Here is an example poem:

The day was dark with clouds,

 

     and rain seemed near.

Something about the air,
 
just didn’t feel right.

          The car pulled up.

 

There was a sense of movement,

   and it was time to go.

Experimental Poetry Form: rhyming with syllable count for the rhyming words

This experimental poetry form focuses on rhyming, with the added feature of syllable count for the rhyming words.  Here are the specifics of the form:

One stanza

Six lines

Five words per line

Lines 1 and 4 rhyme

Lines 2 and 5 rhyme

Lines 3 and 6 rhyme

Lines 1 and 4 each end with a one syllable word

Lines 2 and 5 each end with a two syllable word

Lines 3 and 6 each end with a three syllable word

 

Here is an example poem to illustrate the form:

Radio play

There alone on the chair,
sitting by the radio seeing,
the man hiding there silently,
and imagining his cold glare,
knowing he’s a fictional being,
yet still running off violently.

Experimental Poetry Form: stanza with trochaic and dactylic meters

Today’s experimental poetry form uses two poetic meters: trochaic and dactylic.  The poem has one stanza with six lines.  The odd lines use trochaic meter and the even lines use dactylic.  The odd lines have three feet (for six syllables) and the even lines have two feet (also for six syllables).  Here is how the form looks:

*.*.*.
*..*..
*.*.*.
*..*..
*.*.*.
*..*..

The stressed syllables are noted with an “*” and the unstressed syllables with a “.”.

Here is an example poem written in the form:

Seeking shelter nearby,
energy vaporized,
empty footsteps taken,
quietly crumbling,
silent echoes seeking,
rescuing peacefulness.

Experimental Poetry Form: stanza with amphibrachic meter

Today’s experimental poetry form uses amphibrachic meter.  An example of a word with amphibrachic meter is “regretful”.

To keep things simple, as the meter could possibly be less commonly used, the form has only one stanza with five lines and no rhyme.  Each line has three amphibrachic feet.

Here is an example poem:

Regretful expressions continue,
enduring beyond the encounter,
survey lines establish a title,
a lasting control of attention,
enduring within the remembrance.

Experimental Poetry Form: Repeat Pattern

This experimental poetry form comes from part of yesterday’s poem.  At the end of the poem, there were the stanzas:

He walked away,
and wondered why,
she did not pause,
before her words.

He walked away,
and wondered why,
she did not speak,
the truth to him.

It seemed to him,
it would have been,
a better scene,
had she said no.

It seemed to him,
it would have been,
a better scene,
had she spoke truth.

He walked away,
and wondered why,
he spoke those words,
those days ago.

The four syllables per line and the four lines per stanza, were a thought through element of the poem, that came early on in the poem’s writing.  The repeats however, were something that developed as the poem was written.

As you can see above, there is pattern that is as follows:

Line A,
Line B,
****,
****.

Line A,
Line B,
****,
****.

Line C,
Line D,
Line E,
****.

Line C,
Line D,
Line E,
****.

Line A,
Line B,
****,
****.

The pattern above seemed to form a cohesive pattern and inspired today’s experimental poetry form.

Today’s form is called Repeat Pattern, and has the following characteristics:

Stanzas: 5

Lines per stanza: 4

Syllables per line: 4

Repeating Pattern: AB** AB** CDE* CDE* AB**, with the letters representing repeats, and the *’s representing individual lines.

An example of the use of this form can be found in the partial poem above.  Again, the full poem can be read in yesterday’s post.

Experimental Poetry Form: Eight, eight and first words

This experimental poetry form called is eight, eight and first words.  In the form, there are eight lines.  Each line has eight words.  There is a word pattern as follows:

The first word of the second line, is the second word of the first line.

The first word of the third line, is the third word of the first line.

The first word of the fourth line, is the fourth word of the first line.

.
.
.

The first word of the eighth line, is the eighth word of the first line.

The form looks as follows with *’s representing words that aren’t repeated with any intention, and letters representing repeated words:

ABCDEFGH
B*******
C*******
D*******
E*******
F*******
G*******
H*******

Here is an example poem:

There thinking back upon the past decision made,
thinking of the moment of choice that day,
back in the place with the stone pathways,
upon the ground with the designation of thought,
the deep sense of stepping forward with words,
past decisions though cannot be changed with sense,
decision is a stone with a great weight,
made by moments of past thoughts and times.

Some issues to keep in mind when using the form are, first, to think about the form of words in the first line.  The form of verb or whether a noun is singular or plural can affect its use as the first word of another line.  Also, counting by words may not be as natural to some as counting by syllables.  Counting the words of each line as each is written would be advisable.  Thirdly, there is the idea that the poem must make sense in the form.  It must fit within it and still have some clarity.

Experimental Poetry Form: Anapestic meter with a mirror rhyming scheme

Today’s experimental poetry form uses anapestic meter with a mirror rhyming scheme.

In this form, there are eight lines, each with three anapestic feet.  Anapestic meter is what you might hear in a limerick.

The rhyming scheme is a mirror rhyming scheme and is as follows: ABCDDCBA.

Here is an example poem:

There a small piece of paper was left,
just around on a desk by a chair,
it was left with no thought one would see,
but the eyes and the mind they did peer,
as the feet of the cat they drew near,
and the sense of the right it did flee,
as the eyes there so wide they did glare,
and there snoop in a way o’ so deft.

Experimental Poetry Form: ironing

Today’s experimental poetry form is called ironing.  It has alternating “wrinkled” and “ironed” lines.

The wrinkled lines are free verse.  The only restriction is that the lines are self-contained.  Each line should make sense in some way without having to read part of the next line.

The ironed lines are blank verse.  They are written in iambic pentameter.  These lines too should be self-contained.

The poem is six lines long.  The pattern is wrinkled, ironed, wrinkled, ironed, wrinkled, ironed.

None of the lines should rhyme in any intentional way and there are no other form elements.