Experimental Poetry Form: stanza with amphibrachic meter

Today’s experimental poetry form uses amphibrachic meter.  An example of a word with amphibrachic meter is “regretful”.

To keep things simple, as the meter could possibly be less commonly used, the form has only one stanza with five lines and no rhyme.  Each line has three amphibrachic feet.

Here is an example poem:

Regretful expressions continue,
enduring beyond the encounter,
survey lines establish a title,
a lasting control of attention,
enduring within the remembrance.

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Experimental Poetry Form: Repeat Pattern

This experimental poetry form comes from part of yesterday’s poem.  At the end of the poem, there were the stanzas:

He walked away,
and wondered why,
she did not pause,
before her words.

He walked away,
and wondered why,
she did not speak,
the truth to him.

It seemed to him,
it would have been,
a better scene,
had she said no.

It seemed to him,
it would have been,
a better scene,
had she spoke truth.

He walked away,
and wondered why,
he spoke those words,
those days ago.

The four syllables per line and the four lines per stanza, were a thought through element of the poem, that came early on in the poem’s writing.  The repeats however, were something that developed as the poem was written.

As you can see above, there is pattern that is as follows:

Line A,
Line B,
****,
****.

Line A,
Line B,
****,
****.

Line C,
Line D,
Line E,
****.

Line C,
Line D,
Line E,
****.

Line A,
Line B,
****,
****.

The pattern above seemed to form a cohesive pattern and inspired today’s experimental poetry form.

Today’s form is called Repeat Pattern, and has the following characteristics:

Stanzas: 5

Lines per stanza: 4

Syllables per line: 4

Repeating Pattern: AB** AB** CDE* CDE* AB**, with the letters representing repeats, and the *’s representing individual lines.

An example of the use of this form can be found in the partial poem above.  Again, the full poem can be read in yesterday’s post.

Experimental Poetry Form: Eight, eight and first words

This experimental poetry form called is eight, eight and first words.  In the form, there are eight lines.  Each line has eight words.  There is a word pattern as follows:

The first word of the second line, is the second word of the first line.

The first word of the third line, is the third word of the first line.

The first word of the fourth line, is the fourth word of the first line.

.
.
.

The first word of the eighth line, is the eighth word of the first line.

The form looks as follows with *’s representing words that aren’t repeated with any intention, and letters representing repeated words:

ABCDEFGH
B*******
C*******
D*******
E*******
F*******
G*******
H*******

Here is an example poem:

There thinking back upon the past decision made,
thinking of the moment of choice that day,
back in the place with the stone pathways,
upon the ground with the designation of thought,
the deep sense of stepping forward with words,
past decisions though cannot be changed with sense,
decision is a stone with a great weight,
made by moments of past thoughts and times.

Some issues to keep in mind when using the form are, first, to think about the form of words in the first line.  The form of verb or whether a noun is singular or plural can affect its use as the first word of another line.  Also, counting by words may not be as natural to some as counting by syllables.  Counting the words of each line as each is written would be advisable.  Thirdly, there is the idea that the poem must make sense in the form.  It must fit within it and still have some clarity.

Experimental Poetry Form: Anapestic meter with a mirror rhyming scheme

Today’s experimental poetry form uses anapestic meter with a mirror rhyming scheme.

In this form, there are eight lines, each with three anapestic feet.  Anapestic meter is what you might hear in a limerick.

The rhyming scheme is a mirror rhyming scheme and is as follows: ABCDDCBA.

Here is an example poem:

There a small piece of paper was left,
just around on a desk by a chair,
it was left with no thought one would see,
but the eyes and the mind they did peer,
as the feet of the cat they drew near,
and the sense of the right it did flee,
as the eyes there so wide they did glare,
and there snoop in a way o’ so deft.

Experimental Poetry Form: ironing

Today’s experimental poetry form is called ironing.  It has alternating “wrinkled” and “ironed” lines.

The wrinkled lines are free verse.  The only restriction is that the lines are self-contained.  Each line should make sense in some way without having to read part of the next line.

The ironed lines are blank verse.  They are written in iambic pentameter.  These lines too should be self-contained.

The poem is six lines long.  The pattern is wrinkled, ironed, wrinkled, ironed, wrinkled, ironed.

None of the lines should rhyme in any intentional way and there are no other form elements.

Experimental Poetry Form: two and three

This experimental poetry form is called two and three.  It is fairly simple.  The poem has ten lines that alternate having two and three syllables per line.  Using syllable counts to show the lines, the form looks like this:

2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3

Here is an example poem written in the form:

Guess what?
It is soon.
It is.
Near a year.
Next week.
Excited?
You are.
It’s so cool.
Just think,
one whole year.

P. S. The poem above is about M. Sakran’s self-published eBook, Understanding: poems with explanations. It’s an eBook of poems with explanations. The one year anniversary of its self-publication is this Wednesday, the 27th.  If you like the poems with explanations that have been on this blog, you might like the eBook too.

Experimental Poetry Form: 4353

This experimental poetry form is called 4353.  It uses the number of letters in words as its basis.  The form contains one stanza.  The stanza is four lines long.  Each line of the stanza has four words.  In each line, the first word contains four letters, the second three, the third five and the fourth three.  Using the letter counts to represent the words, the form looks like this:

4 3 5 3
4 3 5 3
4 3 5 3
4 3 5 3

Here is an example poem written in the form:

Time and every bit,
does sit heavy now,
when all sighs hit,
upon the tense day.

The idea of the form is to have a short poem that looks to be based upon word count.  The letter count aspect of it, is meant to be subtle.

Experimental Poetry Form: moving rhyme

This experimental poetry form is called moving rhyme.  The form consists of five lines, each with five words.  The last word of the first line, rhymes with the fourth word of the second line, the third word of the third line, the second word of the fourth line and the first word of the fifth line.  The structure looks like this:

* * * * R
* * * R *
* * R * *
* R * * *
R * * * *

Here is an example poem written in the form:

You want to have gold?
That’s such a bold thing.
Were you told you would,
soon hold all that value?
Sold a lie you were.

Experimental Poetry Form: coins

Today’s experimental poetry form is called coins.  In the United States, there are pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters, half dollars, and dollar coins (there may be others as well).  This lends itself to a poetry form with the numbers: 1 (penny), 5 (nickel), 10 (dime), 25 (quarter), 50 (half dollar) and 100 (dollar).

The poetry form consists of five stanzas.  The first stanza has just one syllable, the second five, the third ten, the fourth twenty five, the fifth fifty and the sixth one hundred.  The number of lines, in all but the first stanza, as well as other structural elements, such as indentations, are variable.

Here is an example poem written in the form:

You,

stand up,
and hear now,

the words that will be spoken,
by the twelve.

The thoughts they form,
from all the images,
will from now,
and for all who speak,
and hear,
be the truth that is.

Though not being,
not seeing,
not hearing,
not knowing,
the mark is made,
as words are said,
and into iron,
it is seared,
and into stone,
it is carved,
and all who see,
and all who hear,
will know the truth,
that is.

Yet what is this,
that they all speak,
that all affirm,
to now be truth?
It is half of life,
and half of sense,
and half of anything,
that is.
It is a cloud,
that stands,
with might,
and form,
and shape,
and with a yell,
says it is of stone,
and yet its strength,
is just a myth.
For the words that are said,
the truth that is chiseled,
are only words,
and only thoughts,
and are not stone,
and are not steel.
Yet all stand,
and hear words,
that are now truth.

Experimental Poetry Form: firefly

Today’s experimental poetry form is called firefly.  It has the following characteristics:

It is one line long.

The line consists of seven words (there are seven letters in firefly).

Each word is two syllables long (although there are probably different thoughts on this, firefly could be considered a two syllable word).

The poem is an acrostic for firefly.

 

Here is an example poem:

Fighting intense regrets, empties flowing letters yearly.