Post series: Advent: Poem: The Christmas Stone

One year
she received
a polished stone
as gift
for Christmas.

Though
it looked nice
and was smooth
and shined
it did seem
kind of pointless.

Who would send a stone?
Why would they send it?
What was she supposed to do with it?

Not understanding
she kept it though
and put it on the mantle
beside a clock.

Time passed
and years passed
and every so often
she would dust the mantle
and clean the stone.

It still
looked nice
and was smooth
and shined
but still
it seemed
without purpose.

On a Christmas day
her sister came
and with her she brought
a small girl.

Small
and quiet
and five years old
she did not talk
and had not ever.

Carrying the girl
in her arms
she showed her the tree
the lights that glowed
and the ornaments.

She walked around
and showed her garland
and nutcrackers
and little trees.

Coming to the mantle
she showed her the clock
and the candles
and then the small stone.

The girl looked
and held the stone
in her small hand
and gazed at it
with small brown eyes.

She told the girl
it was a special stone
a Christmas stone
and that it came
from far away.

She said it was special
because it was a gift
that was meant to last
for a long time.

She said it was special
because of the time
and all it took
for the stone to be there.

She said it was special
because it was a gift
sent especially to her.

The small girl gazed
and looked at the stone
and seemed to marvel
at the colors it contained.

Then she said
that if the girl wanted
the stone could be hers
as a Christmas gift.

The girl looked up
with small brown eyes
and with a smile
she nodded her head.

She set the girl down
and she scurried to a chair
sat in a ball
and looked at the stone.

Minute after minute
and for more than an hour
she felt its surface
and looked at its colors

The woman then came
beside the girl
and said to her
that there was something else
about the stone
the girl should know.

The girl looked up
and with her eyes
asked what it was.

She told the girl
it was a story stone
and with it
amazing stories
could be told.

She said the girl
could think of the stone
like a gem in princess’s necklace.

She said it could be
a special key
that could open a secret door.

She said it could be
something from space
that fell from a star
that passed by.

She said it could be
whatever the girl wanted
and that with it
the girl could tell
so many stories.

The girl looked at the stone
as her eyes grew wide
and she scurried away
to another room.

An hour later
the girl returned
and held a paper
in her hand.

It had a cat
with a collar
with a gem that dangled
from a loop.

From the gem
yellow lines came out.

Away from the cat
was girl
who looked like the one
with the brown eyes.

The girl pointed to drawing
pointed to the girl
pointed to the cat
pointed to gem
and moved her finger
from along the yellow lines
to the girl on the paper.

Looking down
the woman thought
and then asked
if the girl
found the cat
who was lost
because the stone
shined in the sun.

The girl smiled
and nodded
and clapped her hands.

Though not a word
this was a start
and the woman thanked in her mind
whoever had sent
the Christmas stone.

She resolved in herself
to send one too
hoping it also
would bring some joy.

Poem with an explanation: Apples from orange trees

She picked an apple,
from the orange tree,
and fed it to a wolf.

The wolf then went,
to find a deer,
and told it of lake.

The deer then went,
to find the lake,
and drank all of the sand.

And in the sand,
it saw acorns,
that fell from the pine trees.

It planted one,
in the water,
and stood beneath the moon.

And in the dark,
the tree grew orange,
with apples on its stems.

She picked an apple,
from the orange tree,
and fed it to a wolf.

 

This poem is surreal and a little like a fairy tale.  The general idea of the girl, with the animals that behave like people, is part of the fairy tale.  In each stanza, there is at least one element that is surreal.

In the first stanza, the girl picks an apple, from an orange tree.  This is surreal.  It is also a little play on words, because the tree is colored orange, rather than having oranges on it.  Then, she feeds the apple to a wolf.  This is surreal, because a wolf does not eat apples.

In the second stanza, the wolf goes, and finds a deer.  Rather that eating the deer or even telling it of the apple from the orange tree, it tells it of something that seems completely unrelated, a lake.  This is all surreal.

In the third stanza, the deer goes to lake, but rather than drinking the water from it, it drinks the sand around it.  This is surreal.

In the fourth stanza, the deer finds acorns in the sand.  This is surreal because acorns would normally be in a forest.  Additionally, these acorns, did not fall from oak trees, but instead pine trees.  This is also surreal.

In the fifth stanza, the deer plants an acorn, but not in the sand, but in the water.  This is surreal.  The deer is standing beneath the moon.  Up to this point, readers may have thought the poem was in daytime.  This adds to the fairy tale element of it.

In the sixth stanza, the tree from the acorn grew in the dark (as opposed to the light).  The tree also came out colored orange, with apples on its stems.  This, again, is all surreal.

The last stanza, is like the first, and brings circularity to the poem.  It also shows that what the wolf told the deer was actually related to its experience.