Experimental Poetry Form: 8/30/3 with choice

The following experimental poetry form combines line count, syllable count and rhyme in a form that has some choice regarding its application.

In the form there are:

Eight lines.  The poet can choose the stanza structure for those lines.

Thirty syllables.  There is no syllable count per line requirement.  The poet can choose how many syllables are in each line under the thirty syllable restriction.

Three lines that rhyme.  The poet can choose which three of the eight lines rhyme.

Here is an example poem written in the form:

X-rays,
dangerous?

What gave you that idea?

That thick lead wall,
that’s so tall?

That’s just there …

BEEP

hold on, have to run to the hall.

Experimental Poetry Form: Repeat Pattern

This experimental poetry form comes from part of yesterday’s poem.  At the end of the poem, there were the stanzas:

He walked away,
and wondered why,
she did not pause,
before her words.

He walked away,
and wondered why,
she did not speak,
the truth to him.

It seemed to him,
it would have been,
a better scene,
had she said no.

It seemed to him,
it would have been,
a better scene,
had she spoke truth.

He walked away,
and wondered why,
he spoke those words,
those days ago.

The four syllables per line and the four lines per stanza, were a thought through element of the poem, that came early on in the poem’s writing.  The repeats however, were something that developed as the poem was written.

As you can see above, there is pattern that is as follows:

Line A,
Line B,
****,
****.

Line A,
Line B,
****,
****.

Line C,
Line D,
Line E,
****.

Line C,
Line D,
Line E,
****.

Line A,
Line B,
****,
****.

The pattern above seemed to form a cohesive pattern and inspired today’s experimental poetry form.

Today’s form is called Repeat Pattern, and has the following characteristics:

Stanzas: 5

Lines per stanza: 4

Syllables per line: 4

Repeating Pattern: AB** AB** CDE* CDE* AB**, with the letters representing repeats, and the *’s representing individual lines.

An example of the use of this form can be found in the partial poem above.  Again, the full poem can be read in yesterday’s post.

Poem: he wondered why

He did see her,
when he came by,
and thought that she,
did see him too.

One day he asked,
if she might like,
to spend a day,
about with him.

She thought and said,
that that was fine,
and she would like,
such an idea.

But when he left,
her friends did say,
“No, not with him,
he is a dud.”

She thought and felt,
that what they thought,
did mean so much,
to who she was.

She said to them,
she did not think,
and she would not,
go out with him.

The next day came,
and he came by,
and she went off,
and hid away.

Two days did pass,
and he did show,
to ask about,
the day agreed.

But like before,
she hid away,
and he stood there,
right there alone.

But with much hope,
he did come by,
upon the day,
that was agreed.

He stood with hope,
and flowers too,
and waited there,
for her to be.

But she was off,
with all of them,
who said that he,
was such a dud.

And they did laugh,
aloud with glee,
but in her heart,
she knew his pain.

And there he stood,
as time did pass,
until the truth,
did fill his mind.

He knew inside,
like times before,
that what he saw,
was a mirage.

He walked away,
and wondered why,
she did not pause,
before her words.

He walked away,
and wondered why,
she did not speak,
the truth to him.

It seemed to him,
it would have been,
a better scene,
had she said no.

It seemed to him,
it would have been,
a better scene,
had she spoke truth.

He walked away,
and wondered why,
he spoke those words,
those days ago.

Experimental Poetry Form: ten two word lines

This experimental poetry form is called ten two word lines.  The name describes it.  There are ten lines, each with two words.  The line length and total number of words is low, but the number of lines is high.  The idea is to see how these contrasting form elements effect the presentation of the poem.

Here is an example poem:

Sitting there,
sign up,
looking on,
cars passing,
none looking,
none stopping,
wondering if,
all think,
bold words,
are lies.