Experimental Poetry Form: moving rhyme

This experimental poetry form is called moving rhyme.  The form consists of five lines, each with five words.  The last word of the first line, rhymes with the fourth word of the second line, the third word of the third line, the second word of the fourth line and the first word of the fifth line.  The structure looks like this:

* * * * R
* * * R *
* * R * *
* R * * *
R * * * *

Here is an example poem written in the form:

You want to have gold?
That’s such a bold thing.
Were you told you would,
soon hold all that value?
Sold a lie you were.

Experimental Poetry Form: coins

Today’s experimental poetry form is called coins.  In the United States, there are pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters, half dollars, and dollar coins (there may be others as well).  This lends itself to a poetry form with the numbers: 1 (penny), 5 (nickel), 10 (dime), 25 (quarter), 50 (half dollar) and 100 (dollar).

The poetry form consists of five stanzas.  The first stanza has just one syllable, the second five, the third ten, the fourth twenty five, the fifth fifty and the sixth one hundred.  The number of lines, in all but the first stanza, as well as other structural elements, such as indentations, are variable.

Here is an example poem written in the form:

You,

stand up,
and hear now,

the words that will be spoken,
by the twelve.

The thoughts they form,
from all the images,
will from now,
and for all who speak,
and hear,
be the truth that is.

Though not being,
not seeing,
not hearing,
not knowing,
the mark is made,
as words are said,
and into iron,
it is seared,
and into stone,
it is carved,
and all who see,
and all who hear,
will know the truth,
that is.

Yet what is this,
that they all speak,
that all affirm,
to now be truth?
It is half of life,
and half of sense,
and half of anything,
that is.
It is a cloud,
that stands,
with might,
and form,
and shape,
and with a yell,
says it is of stone,
and yet its strength,
is just a myth.
For the words that are said,
the truth that is chiseled,
are only words,
and only thoughts,
and are not stone,
and are not steel.
Yet all stand,
and hear words,
that are now truth.

Experimental Poetry Form: firefly

Today’s experimental poetry form is called firefly.  It has the following characteristics:

It is one line long.

The line consists of seven words (there are seven letters in firefly).

Each word is two syllables long (although there are probably different thoughts on this, firefly could be considered a two syllable word).

The poem is an acrostic for firefly.

 

Here is an example poem:

Fighting intense regrets, empties flowing letters yearly.

Experimental Poetry Form: third word is the first word

Today’s experimental poetry form is called third word is the first word.  The form consists of ten lines, each ten words long.  The first word of each line, for lines two through ten, is the third word of the previous line.  So the first word of line two, is the third word of line one.  The first word of line three, is the third word of line two.  This continues for the remaining lines.  Here is a poem written in the form with italics and bold to show the word pattern.

When that silver bell tolls softly in the far distance,
silver butterflies take flight as if on a soft breeze.
Take care though, of the bright silver shine and sound.
Though appearing as though a charm, it is a curse.
As silver in the light and on the breeze shines,
in the glow dark bats hide and let out shrieks.
Glow and resonance hides the truth of coming devouring death.
Resonance is a shield of deception for all that follows.
A warning given, is to beware the sound and shine.
Given the truth, shield your eyes and ears now quickly.

A photograph to inspire poetry: cone shaped flowers

cone shaped flowers

Above is a photograph of cone shaped flowers (their name is unknown to M. Sakran).  It can inspire poetry.  For example, a poet could write about:

  • Three people, one an adult and two children.
  •  

  • The idea of going from muted to bright, as inspired by the color change of the central flower.
  •  

  • The idea of being different, inspired by the idea that these three flowers don’t have a “typical” flower shape.
  •  

  • Something to do with cones, for example ice cream cones or traffic cones.

As an example, here is a poem inspired by this photograph:

Is standing out,
something good,
or something bad?

The adages,
either way,
have been heard.

Yet,
in reality,
things are not adages,
there is,
in fact,
in reality,
reality.

To stand out,
amongst the others,
is something whose effect,
is clear.

One will know,
when they find themselves,
standing in the rain,
or in the sun.

A photograph to inspire poetry: Rose of Sharon

Rose of Sharon

Above is a photograph of a flower that might be called Rose of Sharon.  It can inspire poetry.  For example, a poet might write about:

  • Some sort of occasion with yellow flowers.
  •  

  • The change of colors from the outside to the in: Yellow, Red, Yellow, Brown.
  •  

  • Something to do with the possible name of the plant.
  •  

  • A comparison between the yellow flower and the sun.

 

Here is an example poem inspire by the photograph:

Shadows fall,
on the yellow hills,
as fires burn,
within the valley,
and the last tree stands,
unmoving.