A photograph to inspire poetry: black wasp with yellow markings

black wasp with yellow markings

Above is a photograph of a black wasp with yellow markings.  It is on a fig leaf.  This photograph can inspire poetry.  Here is a poem inspired by it:

the tasty figs
they seem for you
but this dark day
you’ll surely rue

beware the sting
of what you see
reach for the fig
and stung you’ll be

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Experimental Poetry Form: prime rhyme

This experimental poetry form has one stanza with ten lines.  The prime numbered lines (2, 3, 5, and 7) rhyme.  The form has no other requirements.

Here is an example poem written in the form:

Hello scientifically determined ideal weight.
It’s very nice to meet you.
Well, that’s not exactly true.
You see, you’re not really here.
Now that may have come from out of the blue,
but trust that it’s actually the truth,
and it isn’t really something new.
The thing is, you never really existed.
Somebody just sort of made you up.
Yeah, this is awkward.

Experimental Poetry Form: complex

Yesterday’s experimental poetry form was basic.  This one is complex.  It has a number of elements.  They include: stanzas, lines per stanza, rhyming pattern in each stanza, meter in each stanza, metrical feet in each line of each stanza, indentions of each line in each stanza, and acrostic pattern in each stanza.

Here are the details:

Stanzas: 4

Lines per stanza:

  Stanza one: 3

  Stanza two: 4

  Stanza three: 2

  Stanza four: 5

Rhyming pattern in each stanza:

  Stanza one: lines 1 and 3

  Stanza two: lines 3 and 4

  Stanza three: lines 1 and 2

  Stanza four: lines 1, 3, and 5

Meter in each stanza:

  Stanza one: iambic

  Stanza two: trochaic

  Stanza three: anapestic

  Stanza four: iambic

Metrical feet in each line of each stanza:

  Stanza one: 3

  Stanza two: 4

  Stanza three: 3

  Stanza four: 5

Indentions of each line in each stanza:

  Stanza one:

    Line 1: 0

    Line 2: 2

    Line 3: 4

  Stanza two:

    Line 1: 1

    Line 2: 3

    Line 3: 2

    Line 4: 4

  Stanza three:

    Line 1: 5

    Line 2: 5

  Stanza four:

    Line 1: 0

    Line 2: 2

    Line 3: 2

    Line 4: 1

    Line 5: 4

Acrostic pattern in each stanza:

  Stanza one: NOW

  Stanza two: LOOK

  Stanza three: AT

  Stanza four: WORDS

 

Below is what the form looks like.  The *s represent short syllables, the /s represent long syllables, the Rs followed by a letter (a, b, c, d) represent rhyming groups, and the letters at the end of lines show the acrostic pattern.

 

*/ */ */ Ra  N
  */ */ */  O
    */ */ */ Ra  W

 /* /* /* /*  L
   /* /* /* /*  O
  /* /* /* /* Rb  O
    /* /* /* /* Rb  K

     **/ **/ **/ Rc  A
     **/ **/ **/ Rc  T

*/ */ */ */ */ Rd  W
  */ */ */ */ */  O
  */ */ */ */ */ Rd  R
 */ */ */ */ */  D
    */ */ */ */ */ Rd  S

Experimental Poetry Form: jack, queen, king

Today’s experimental poetry form is called jack, queen, king.  It is based off of the cards of those names in a deck of cards.

The form is an acrostic form with three stanzas.  The first stanza is an acrostic form for “jack”.  The second stanza is an acrostic form for “queen”.  The third stanza is an acrostic form for “king”.

In the first stanza, each line has eleven syllables, because a jack has a value of eleven.  In the second stanza, each line has twelve syllables, because a queen has a value of twelve.  In the third stanza, each line has thirteen syllables because a king has a value of thirteen.

The form also includes a rhyming pattern.  Lines 2, 6, 7, 8, and 11 rhyme.  Lines 1, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 12, and 13 rhyme.  The idea here is that lines that start with a vowel rhyme and lines that start with a consonant rhyme.

Here are the elements of the form:

J – 11 syllables, Rhyme A
A – 11 syllables, Rhyme B
C – 11 syllables, Rhyme A
K – 11 syllables, Rhyme A

Q – 12 syllables, Rhyme A
U – 12 syllables, Rhyme B
E – 12 syllables, Rhyme B
E – 12 syllables, Rhyme B
N – 12 syllables, Rhyme A

K – 13 syllables, Rhyme A
I – 13 syllables, Rhyme B
N – 13 syllables, Rhyme A
G – 13 syllables, Rhyme A

Here is an example poem using the form:

Jumping into the air with the ball in hand,
all hold their breath as the seconds tick on down,
climbing into the air as all around stand,
knowing if made that all will cheer in the land.

Quickly throwing the ball as all bases were manned,
understanding the meaning as the coach did frown,
ending the game would cause a party in the town,
expecting the umpire to say that one noun,
not knowing what would happen for nothing was planned.

Kicking the round ball with help from the adrenal gland,
into the net not thinking of the past patient gown,
not thinking too of the leg that was no longer tanned,
getting the final goal as all the cameras panned.

Experimental Poetry Form: trochaic meter and rhyme

Today’s experimental poetry form consists of trochaic meter and rhyme.  The form has two stanzas.  Each stanza has four lines.  Each line has four trochaic feet.  In each stanzas, the even lines rhyme.  With each trochaic foot marked with *s and the rhyming lines noted with r’s, the form looks as follows:

****
****r1
****
****r1

****
****r2
****
****r2

Experimental Poetry Form: anapestic meter with rhyme

Today’s experimental poetry form uses anapestic meter.  In each foot of this meter there are two short syllables followed by a long one.  It is the meter you might hear in a limerick.

In the form, there is one stanza with eight lines.  Each line has two anapestic feet.  In the form, lines two and four rhyme, and lines six and eight rhyme.  With the unstressed syllables noted with an -, the stress syllables noted with an *, and the rhyming lines noted with R and a number, the form looks as follows:

– – * – – *
– – * – – * R 1
– – * – – *
– – * – – * R 1
– – * – – *
– – * – – * R 2
– – * – – *
– – * – – * R 2

Here is an example poem using the form:

The small dog did have wings,
and it flew in the sky.
And the birds they did watch,
as the dog it flew by.
Then they asked how it flew,
and the dog it did say,
that it flew with its wings,
that it flew just like they.

 

As a note, there will be new blog post on M. Sakran’s blog of and about poetry and poetry related things November 22, 2018 – November 25, 2018.  The next new post will be on November 26, 2018.  Happy Thanksgiving.

Experimental Poetry Form: 8/30/3 with choice

The following experimental poetry form combines line count, syllable count and rhyme in a form that has some choice regarding its application.

In the form there are:

Eight lines.  The poet can choose the stanza structure for those lines.

Thirty syllables.  There is no syllable count per line requirement.  The poet can choose how many syllables are in each line under the thirty syllable restriction.

Three lines that rhyme.  The poet can choose which three of the eight lines rhyme.

Here is an example poem written in the form:

X-rays,
dangerous?

What gave you that idea?

That thick lead wall,
that’s so tall?

That’s just there …

BEEP

hold on, have to run to the hall.

Experimental Poetry Form: dactylic meter with rhyme

Today’s poetry form combines dactylic meter with rhyme.  The form contains one stanza of five lines.  Lines 1 and 3 rhyme.  Lines 2, 4 and 5 rhyme.  Each line contains four dactylic feet (thereby each having 12 syllables).  Below is what the form looks like.  The meter is marked with a * for the stressed syllables and a ~ for the unstressed syllables.  The rhymes are marked R1 and R2.

*~~*~~*~~*~~ R1
*~~*~~*~~*~~ R2
*~~*~~*~~*~~ R1
*~~*~~*~~*~~ R2
*~~*~~*~~*~~ R2

Experimental Poetry Form: two triangles

This experimental poetry form is called two triangles, and is based off of word count, page layout and rhyme.

The poem is centered on the page.  The first line has ten words, the second nine, the third eight, and so forth to the tenth line which has one word.  The eleventh line also has one word, the twelfth has two, the thirteenth has three, and this continues to the twentieth line which has ten words.  Lines of equal word count rhyme.

Below is what the form looks like.  A * represents a word.

**********
*********
********
*******
******
*****
****
***
**
*
*
**
***
****
*****
******
*******
********
*********
**********

The rhyming pattern is:

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
J
I
H
G
F
E
D
C
B
A

Experimental Poetry Form: Anapestic meter with a mirror rhyming scheme

Today’s experimental poetry form uses anapestic meter with a mirror rhyming scheme.

In this form, there are eight lines, each with three anapestic feet.  Anapestic meter is what you might hear in a limerick.

The rhyming scheme is a mirror rhyming scheme and is as follows: ABCDDCBA.

Here is an example poem:

There a small piece of paper was left,
just around on a desk by a chair,
it was left with no thought one would see,
but the eyes and the mind they did peer,
as the feet of the cat they drew near,
and the sense of the right it did flee,
as the eyes there so wide they did glare,
and there snoop in a way o’ so deft.