Bilingual Poem: summer solstice

the summer solstice
the longest day of the year
but think about that
each day
until the winter solstice
will be a little darker
than the day before

 

el solsticio de verano
el día de más luz del año
pero reflexionan de que
cada día
hasta el solsticio de invierno
estará un poco más oscuro
que el día antes

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Poetry topic idea: winter solstice

Today is the winter solstice.  Happy shortest day of the year! (If you are in the southern hemisphere – happy summer solstice.  Happy longest day of the year!)

This day can inspire poetry.  The ideas of darkness, light, seasons, change, turning points, and so forth can all be used in poetry.  They can be applied to many different ideas.  Here is a poem inspired by the day:

the doctor said,
for the first time,
it got smaller

 

Note:

Because of Christmas, there will be no new blog post on the blog December 22 – December 25.  The next new blog post will be on December 26.  Merry Christmas.

Poem with an explanation: A dark celebration

There are celebrations,
celebrations on the mountain peak,
of the glowing warmth,
and dances in the wildflower fields.

But this is false,
for there behind the mountain peak,
the wings of dread do spread,
and the flight of darkness soars.

But in the fields,
all is joy,
as butterflies fly,
from bloom to bloom.

But the edges darken,
from red to black,
and the swallowing of all,
begins.

It all seems joy,
as arms twirl about,
and all the warm,
fills the land.

But tears do fall,
from knowing eyes,
for they do know,
the fire dims.

The cheers of joy,
for what is high,
not seeing that,
today it falls.

 

This poem is about the summer solstice.  It might depend on where a person lives, but the summer solstice could start late tonight.  Tomorrow, will be the longest day of the year, in terms of sunlight.

The longest day of the year is often celebrated because it has the most light of any day of the year.  This poem takes a different perspective and looks at it as a day of dread.

It is a day of dread, because from this point on, until the winter solstice, every day will get shorter.  Since this is the peak, it is the start of the fall.  This day is the last day when light grows, and because of this, the poem takes the perspective that it is a day to be feared, rather than celebrated.

The poem alternates between celebration and dread.  The first stanza is one of celebration.  It describes the celebration of the longest day (the mountain peak), of all the sunshine (the glowing warmth) and talks of the celebration of nature (dances in the wildflower fields).

The next stanza starts the dread.  It uses a metaphor of a dragon.  It says that the celebrating is for something false.  It says that after the longest day (behind the mountain peak), something ominous is coming (the wings of dread do spread) and this ominous thing is the increasing darkness from this point until the winter solstice (the flight of darkness soars).

In the next stanza, there is an unawareness of this.  It is as if the people celebrating in the field, don’t see the shadow rise behind the mountain.  The stanza talks of joy, butterflies and blooms.

The following stanza goes back to the ominous idea.  It uses the imagery of darkness swallowing all.  Like a cloud of darkness starting at the horizons and covering the land.  It uses the image of “red to black” to play off the idea of a sunset.

In the field though, there is an unawareness.  The celebrations continue as people bask in the sunshine and dance about.

This is contrasted in the next stanza by a sense of sadness by those that know that a peak leads to a fall.  It is as if all are celebrating the fire at its highest, but there are some that know that the highest point means that it gets lower after that.

The last stanza puts the ideas together and says that the peak is celebrated, but that is because it isn’t seen as the start of the fall.

This poem consists of seven stanzas.  Each stanza is four lines long.  The first six stanzas alternate between happiness and dread.  The last stanza has both ideas together.

P. S. Did you enjoy this poem with an explanation? Did you know that M. Sakran has a self-published eBook of poems with explanations?  You can learn more about the book and purchase a copy from here: Understanding: poems with explanations.