Poem with an explanation: springtime is coming

the treeless branch droops
from the burden of the snow
springtime is coming

 

This poem is about hope.  The poem is a 5-7-5 haiku, and uses nature as a metaphor for a human situation.

In the poem, there is a treeless branch.  This represents a person who has been through a lot.  They have lost their energy.  They have lost their hope.

In addition, the branch droops.  This represents something additional on the person.  The person is pressed down in some way.  What they have been through has pushed them down.

In the poem, the branch is drooping from the burden of the snow.  The snow is what is weighing on the person.  It is the stress, anxiety, problems, and situations the person feels and is going through.  It is a burden to them.  It is what is pressing them down after they have already lost their leaves.

The next line of the poem represents hope.  It says that springtime is coming.  This means the snow will melt and the tree will grow new leaves.  This represents the problems leaving the person and the person becoming revitalized.  It represents a positive future.

In the poem, something that has been through a lot with something weighing it down, will at some point be relieved of what it is going through.  This represents the same idea for a person.

Artwork to inspire poetry: Pen and pencil rose

Pen and pencil rose

Above is an artwork of a rose.  The original was done with pen and pencil.  The outline, part of the leaves, and the petals were in pen.  The stem, leaves, and the part where the petals connect to the stem were shaded in pencil.  This artwork can inspire poetry.  Here is a poem inspired by it:

lifting the puppy
outside on a bright spring day
look at the flowers

Artwork to inspire poetry: Five minute leaf

Five minute leaf

Above is an artwork of a leaf.  The original drawing was done in five minutes.  After that the artwork was scanned, cropped, and around it was cleaned up slightly.  Part of the idea behind the artwork, was to see what would be made with a time constraint.

The artwork can inspire poetry.  Here is a poem inspired by it:

In five minutes,
the leaf unfurled,
spring

Experimental Poetry Form: revolve

This experimental poetry form is called revolve.  It is a simple form, but could be complex if a poet wanted.

The form consists of five words that revolve in position.  In the first line, the words, represented by letters, are as such:

A B C D E

In the second line, the words revolve position:

B C D E A

In the third line, they revolve again:

C D E A B

Again in the fourth line:

D E A B C

Again in the fifth line:

E A B C D

And in the sixth line, the words return to their original positions:

A B C D E

As a poem, the form looks like:

A B C D E
B C D E A
C D E A B
D E A B C
E A B C D
A B C D E

If a poet wanted the form usage to be simple, they could simply have five words that rotate.  The words might relate to the same topic or connect in some way.

Alternatively, a poet could try to select words that make sense in all the orderings.  This would make the form usage more complex.  It might also require the use of punctuation to make the word orders make sense.

Additionally, a poet could take it a step further and have all the lines make sense as a unit, such that the poem felt like a paragraph.  This would be much more complex.

If a poet went with the simple usage, the idea would be to have a poem that doesn’t conform to the idea of sentences or phrases.  It would express ideas simply with individual words.

If a poet went with the complex usage, the idea would be to have a poem that demonstrated a poetic skill, in addition to getting a message across.

Below is an example poem that is somewhere between the simple and the complex use of the form:

Quickly lilies drinking spring sunlight.
Lilies drinking spring sunlight quickly.
Drinking spring sunlight, quickly lilies.
Spring sunlight, quickly lilies drinking.
Sunlight, quickly lilies drinking spring.
Quickly lilies drinking spring sunlight.

Poem: So winter, here’s the thing

So winter,
here’s the thing,
it’s been great,
you know,
the snow,
the cold,
the occasional sleet.

Here’s the thing though,
it’s,
well,
over.

It’s been great,
really,
but,
well,
it’s just time to move on.

Now,
don’t feel bad.
It’s not you,
it’s just,
well,
time moved on,
and well,
um …
have you met spring here?

Listen tough,
really,
don’t feel bad.
You know,
in nine months,
things might feel different,
and well,
hey,
anything’s possible.

So,
yeah,
goodbye.

A photograph to inspire poetry: Butterfly

Butterfly

This photograph is of a butterfly, on a clover flower, by wild strawberries, in the sunshine.  One way that this photograph can inspire poetry, is simply from the idea of spring.  All of the elements (a butterfly, flowers, strawberries and sunshine) relate to spring, and can be used as elements in a poem.