Post Series: Advent: Poetry topic idea: Christmas symbols

Throughout Advent and through the Christmas season you are likely to encounter a number of Christmas symbols.  This includes things like stars, wreaths, Christmas trees, ornaments, candy canes, presents, nutcrackers, and so forth.

You could explore these different symbols in poetry.  You could take some time to learn about their history, their original meanings, their current meanings, how their meanings have changed over time, and how Christian symbolism can be applied to them.

You could either pick one topic such as stars, and explore it in depth, or you could explore a number of different topics in one poem.

This exercise could be a good learning experience about Christmas symbols and it could help you to explain them to others.  It could also be a good exercise to learn about and apply Christian symbolism to the different symbols, both those that started with them, and those that had them applied later.

Here is an example poem looking at stars:

As you place the star,
atop the tree,
and plug the plug,
turn down the lights,
and watch it shine,
think back,
to that one star,
that brought men from the east,
hundreds or thousands of miles,
in search of someone,
they had never met,
whose name they did not know,
whose story they had not heard.

Think about,
how they may have seemed,
to those who knew them.

How strange it must have seemed,
to hear them say,
they were following a light,
to an unknown place.

Think about the journey they took,
the hardships they encountered,
and the faith the must have had.

Think about what they left,
what they risked,
and who they found.

As you look at the star,
atop your tree,
think back,
to that one star,
and see it,
in a new light.

Experimental Poetry Form: Rhyming and Indention

Stanza: 1
Lines: 21
Meter: iambic trimeter
Rhyming and indention pattern:
A
A
A
 B
  C
  C
  C
 B
 B
D
D
 E
 E
 E
D
  F
  G
  F
  G
  F
  G

This experimental poetry from is based on two ideas: rhyming and indention.  The rhyming and indention patterns are there to connect ideas internally, set ideas apart and connect ideas together.

The first set is the three A rhymes.  These lines are not indented and form one complete set.  The idea in these lines is self-contained.

The second set are the B and C rhymes.  Each of B rhyming lines is indented one space and each of the C rhyming lines is indented two spaces.  The first B line is indented to set it apart from the A lines.  The C lines are indented to set them apart from the B lines.  The B and C lines form one set.  The first B line starts an idea, the three C lines move from the idea in some way, and the last two B lines come back to the idea.  For example, if the first B line was about a tree, the three C lines might be about birds in the tree, followed by the last two B lines that would focus on the tree again.  The B and C lines are set apart from the A lines, but they all relate to each other.

As a note, all the lines in the form, form one stanza.  The idea, is that while there are sets of ideas, they all connect together.  The one stanza gives the impression of one cohesive idea, rather than detached ideas put together.

Additionally, all the lines have the same short meter.  This is done to let the lines have flow and to have the focus be on the rhyming.  The short lines are meant to increase the noticeability of the rhyming.

The third set are the D and E rhymes.  The lines of these rhymes mirror the B and C rhymes.  In this case, there are two D rhymes, followed by three E rhymes, followed by one D rhyme.  Also, the indention of these lines is one less than with the B and C lines.  This is to help differentiate them.  The idea with the D and E lines is the same as with the B and C rhyming set, except in this case, the idea of the D rhyme gets a longer initial expression and ends with a shorter expression, which is the opposite of the case with the B lines.  The idea is to express an idea, move away from it, and then come back to it briefly.

The last set are the F and G rhymes.  These lines are indented two spaces to set them apart from the previous set.  Also, these lines only have one indention, which is also the case with the starting A lines.  This helps to close the poetry form.  The rhymes of these lines alternates.  This is the only set in the form that has that.  The idea was to change the sound from the previous set.  These lines are also a self-contained set like the previous ones.

As an example of the form, here is a poem about looking at stars at night:

Above the earth at night,
the stars shine with their light,
and seem to glow so bright.
 Beneath the dark night sky,
  out in the cool night air,
  when cold does cause a care,
  and warmth does feel so rare,
 one turns their look up high,
 and does not wonder why.
The thought does then occur,
and seems without a blur,
 of all that is so vast,
 of looking in the past,
 and light that moves so fast,
and thoughts leave where they were.
  When looking to the stars,
  at night when things are cold,
  the thoughts do leave their jars,
  at what does shine like gold,
  like breaking through some bars,
  they leave what once did hold.

A photograph to inspire poetry: Night sky

Night sky

Yesterday’s blog post was an artwork to inspire poetry entitled Night sky.  The posting of that artwork, lead to the idea of having a similar post of a photograph to inspire poetry.

The above is a photograph of the night sky.  Like the artwork to inspire poetry, this photograph can inspire poetry.  They both can inspire poetry in some similar ways.  For example, in each instance, a poet could be inspired to write a poem about stars.

Despite the fact though that both the artwork and the photograph are images of the night sky, it is clear that the imagined image in the artwork is different from the real image in the photograph.  In the real image, far less stars (and no planets) can be seen than in the imagined image.  This difference between imagination and reality could also serve as an inspiration for poetry.

Artwork to inspire poetry: Night sky

Night sky

The above artwork is entitled Night sky.  It can be clicked on to see it larger.  The artwork can inspire poetry in a variety of ways.

One way it can inspire poetry, is by inspiring a poet to go and look at the actual night sky.  The night sky is filled with many things that could inspire poetry.

Secondly, a poet could look at the artwork and see shapes in the patterns of the stars.  These shapes could inspire poetry.

Additionally, this artwork could inspire general poetry about space, stars, ideas of vastness and the universe.

A poet looking closely at the artwork (in a larger size), may notice four planets depicted.  Seeing them, a poet could, for example, be inspired to write a poem about the relationship between the planets and the stars.

Also, a poet might notice the relative brightness of different stars and use this as a poetry inspiration.

A poet could, seeing the artwork, be inspired to write a poem comparing the ideas of emptiness and being filled, as different portions of the artwork have objects and some do not.

In addition to these ideas, there are many other poetry inspirations that could be inspired by this artwork.

 

A poem with an explanation: Illuminate the darkness

Poems are generally like art in that each viewer (or reader) can interpret the poem in different ways.  Often no explanation of the poem is provided by the poet.  While this is beneficial, it can also be beneficial to understand the poet’s perspective of a poem.

The following has two sections.  The first section has a poem with no explanation.  Please read the poem a few times to develop a personal perspective.  After the poem, an explanation is given. Please read the explanation to understand the poet’s intention.

The poem:

Illuminate the darkness

Darkness fills like a cloud that has no form.

At the point,
lights shine,

but in a way,
do not illuminate the darkness.

Nearby,
lights shine,

but in a way,
do not illuminate the darkness.

In the distance,
lights shine,

but in a way,
do not illuminate the darkness.

Closely,
a light shines,

and it,

illuminates the darkness.

The explanation:

This poem is a dual-level poem.  The first level is the literal level – what the poem is actually describing.  The second level is the metaphorical level – what the poem is conveying.  The poem is meant to be read at the second level.

The first level of this poem is a very simple idea: the Earth in space.  It references the Earth in space with the Sun, stars and planets.  In a literal sense, this is what the poem is describing.  The poem, however, is not meant to be read at this level.  In fact, reading the poem at this level, may make the poem seem less impactful.  This level though is used as a tool to implement the second level of the metaphor – in this case, a person overcoming a problem.  The idea of light illuminating darkness is the main metaphor used.  This is the level that the poem is meant to be read at.

Poem title: Illuminate the darkness

This title was chosen for three reasons.  First, it has an interesting symbolism.  The idea of illuminating darkness can be very symbolic, as well as literal.  Second, it has a “poetic” sound.  Having a certain sound in poems often makes an important difference.  Third, because of this poetic sound, the title was repeated in the poem.  In writing the poem, the repeat of the phrase in the poem inspired the title, rather than the title inspiring the repeat of the phrase.

First line: Darkness fills like a cloud that has no form.

The first line of the poem is set apart from the rest.  It is written as a single line.  This first line is meant to have a certain “darkness” of tone that is represented by the actual darkness being described.  In the literal sense, this line is describing the dark space that is around the Earth.  The darkness fills the space, but at the same time, has no form.  This line is in a sense describing the place.  In the metaphorical sense, this line introduces the problem that is being faced.  No specific problem is mentioned, but the problem is represented by darkness that fills.  It is meant to represent a significant problem.

From this point the four stanzas follow a similar four line form.  The first line describes a location.  Four locations are used: at the point, nearby, in the distance and closely.  The second line is the same for three of the stanzas: lights shine.  In the last stanza it reads “a light shines”.  The third line also takes two forms.  It reads “but in a way” in the first three stanzas and reads “and it” in the last stanza.

First stanza:

At the point,
lights shine,

but in a way,
do not illuminate the darkness.

In the first stanza the location is “at the point”.  In the literal sense, this “point” is the Earth itself.  In the metaphorical sense, this location is signifying the turning point in how a person is facing a problem.  It is a turning point, because up to this point the “darkness” of the problem was over the person and not illuminated.  This time period is described in this stanza and the next two.  In a literal sense, the first stanza could read:

On the Earth,
there are electrical lights,
but these lights,
do not diminish the darkness of space around Earth.

In a metaphorical sense, this first stanza is describing an internal type of help, something that the person realizes internally.  At first, it seems to provide some assistance, but it does not overcome the problem.

The first two lines of the stanza are set apart from the second two.  The first two lines provide a situation and some hope, but the second two lines, indented for separation and to cause a pause, are introduced with the word “but” and show that the hope did not solve the problem.

Second stanza:

Nearby,
lights shine,

but in a way,
do not illuminate the darkness.

In the second stanza, the literal meaning could be read:

The planets in the solar system,
give off light,
but this light,
does not diminish the darkness of space around Earth.

In this stanza, the metaphorical meaning to the location “nearby” is that since the person could not solve their problem with an internal discovery, they look “nearby” for help, or in some sense to help that is readily available.  Similarly though, this does not solve the problem.

Third stanza:

In the distance,
lights shine,

but in a way,
do not illuminate the darkness.

In the third stanza, the literal meaning could be read:

The stars,
give off light,
but this light,
does not diminish the darkness of space around Earth.

In this stanza, the metaphorical meaning to the location “in the distance” is that since the person could not find help to their problem by looking near to themselves, they take the opposite end and look far away.  Similarly though, this does not solve the problem.

These first three stanzas describe a time period up to the turning point the person will face.  Up until this point, the person has not found help to their problem.  All of these stanzas, in a literal sense, describe how the light of the lights on Earth, the stars and the planets are unable to illuminate the darkness of space that is around the Earth.

At first glance it may seem that the lights of the lights on Earth, the stars and the planets are unable to illuminate the darkness of space around Earth because they are insufficient.  This is not the case.  They are unable to illuminate the darkness that is around the Earth, not because of their weakness, but because of the strength of something else.

Fourth stanza:

Closely,
a light shines,

and it,

illuminates the darkness.

This stanza could be written literally as:

The Sun,
gives off light,
and it,
does diminish the darkness of space around Earth.

This final stanza is purposely kept with the preceding three.  The change is meant to be surprising.  The reader is not intended to expect it.

The location “closely” at first may seem strange to the reader.  Up until this stanza, the locations have been progressively getting farther away: at the point, then nearby, then in the distance.  This location may seem strange in that it is closer than “in the distance” but it is unclear whether it is closer than “nearby” or not.  This was done intentionally to symbolize that help to the problem was not in a place that was looked for.  It was close and in some sense overlooked.  In a literal sense, closely represents the Sun.  It is closer than the stars and some planets to Earth, but not as close as some other planets to the Earth.

The second line in the stanza is also an abrupt change.  The three preceding stanzas described “lights”.  This stanza describes “a light”.  The intention was to signify that there is something different about it.  In a literal sense, the Sun is one light, while the other lights are many lights.

The third line continues the change.  Rather than having the negative word “but” there is the positive word “and”.  Additionally, the preceding three third lines were vague with the phrase “in a way”.  The literal idea is that the lights have some effect on the darkness, but do not overtake it.  The line in this stanza is not vague: it says “and it”.  The literal idea is that the light of the Sun has a much larger impact than the other lights.

The last line of this stanza is indented more than any other line.  This is done so to signify its importance.  This line literally describes how the light of the Sun illuminates the darkness of space that is around the Earth.  Metaphorically, this line is on the other side of the turning point.  The person has found hope for their problem that will actually solve their problem.

 

This poem takes something literal: the Earth in space with various lights affecting the darkness around it, and uses it to describe something metaphorical, a person overcoming a problem.  The poem follows a path of the person failing to overcome their problem by trying different things, until they look in a new place and find hope to solve their problem.

This blog entry has been an example of a poem with an explanation.  Hopefully learning the poet’s intent of the poem has provided additional meaning to it.