Experimental Poetry Form: C

This experimental poetry form is called C.  It is based on layout on the page and syllable count.

The form has three lines, two that are horizontal and one that is vertical.  These lines make the C shape.  Each line has ten syllables.  The letters at the corners work for both lines they are in.

Below is what the form looks like with *’s representing the syllables.  The corner letters are marked with ^’s.

^**********
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
^**********

Here is an example poem using the form:

Have you ever seen a kangaroo hop?
o
p
p
i
n
g

a
r
o
u
n
d

l
i
k
e

y
o
u

n
e
v
e
r

c
o
u
l
d

d
of course, it may wonder just how you walk.
.

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Experimental Poetry Form: Three stanzas

This experimental poetry form is called three stanzas.  As the name implies, it consists of three stanzas.  Here are the other qualities:

Stanza one has four lines, stanza two has five, and stanza three has three.

Stanza one is not indented, stanza two has each line indented five spaces, and stanza three has each line indented three spaces.

Stanza one has four syllable lines, stanza two has six syllable lines, and stanza three has five syllable lines.

Each stanza is an acrostic stanza for a different word.

Here is what the form looks like:

****
****………………Word one acrostic
****
****

     ******
     ******………..Word two acrostic
     ******
     ******
     ******

   *****
   *****…………..Word three acrostic
   *****

Here is an example poem written in the form

What is that noise,
heard in the dark,
amongst shadows,
this quiet night?

     Certainly just a dream,
     of fears and dreads of dark,
     made of glimpses and sounds,
     entirely of fog,
     silently in shadows.

   Not falling backward,
   over the cliff’s edge,
   where fear reaches out.

 

P. S. Happy fifth day of Christmas.

 

P. S. S. As Monday is New Year’s Day, there will be no new blog post on the blog that day. Happy New Year.

Experimental Poetry Form: two and three

This experimental poetry form is called two and three.  It is fairly simple.  The poem has ten lines that alternate having two and three syllables per line.  Using syllable counts to show the lines, the form looks like this:

2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3

Here is an example poem written in the form:

Guess what?
It is soon.
It is.
Near a year.
Next week.
Excited?
You are.
It’s so cool.
Just think,
one whole year.

P. S. The poem above is about M. Sakran’s self-published eBook, Understanding: poems with explanations. It’s an eBook of poems with explanations. The one year anniversary of its self-publication is this Wednesday, the 27th.  If you like the poems with explanations that have been on this blog, you might like the eBook too.

Experimental Poetry Form: Five lines with syllable counts and a rhyming pattern

The elements of this experimental poetry form are as follows:

Number of stanzas: 1

Number of lines: 5

Syllables per line: 10 – 8 – 8 – 8 – 10

Rhyming pattern: ABBBA

 

Here is an illustrative example poem:

The food trunk is different and not the same –

  What kind of food do they have there?
  Will it be good or just be fair?
  If it’s bad, will anyone care?

The chicken was yummy cooked on a flame!

Post Series: The Dragonfly Series: Experimental Poetry Form: Dragonfly syllable stresses

Dragonfly is a three syllable word with a stress pattern of: high, low, medium.  This idea is used here to make an experimental poetry form.

The form is ten lines.  Each line has three syllables.  Those syllables follow the same stress pattern as dragonfly.  Ideally the poem should make sense as it flows.

Here is an example poem:

Bumblebee,

bumblebee,

  daffodils,

  marigolds,

  bluebonnets,

resonate,

eye-catching,

dragonfly,

metaphors,

everywhere.

Post Series: The Dragonfly Series: Experimental Poetry Form: Dragonfly

There may be a traceable reason as to why dragonflies are called dragonflies.  There may be some noted origin of the term.  M. Sakran doesn’t actually know.

That being said, one hypothesis might be that dragonflies are large flying insects that are long and colorful.  One could imagine someone saying, “That colorful fly was as big as a dragon.”  A similar notion might be with horseflies (“That fly was as big as a horse.”).

Using this as an idea, there are two elements that can be drawn from dragonflies for the purpose of creating an experimental poetry form.  First, dragonflies are a large version of something small (they are big for something little).  Second, they fly.

With these two elements in mind, an experimental poetry form can be made.  It has the following elements:

Stanzas: 3

Lines per stanza: 3

Syllables per line: 12

Indention pattern:

  Stanza one:

    Line 1: no indent

    Line 2: indented 20 spaces

    Line 3: indented 10 spaces

  Stanza two:

    Line 1: indented 30 spaces

    Line 2: indented 20 spaces

    Line 3: indented 25 spaces

  Stanza three:

    Line 1: indented 50 spaces

    Line 2: indented 10 spaces

    Line 3: indented 20 spaces

Line breaks:

  1 between each stanza line

  2 between each stanza

 

The idea is that the stanzas are relatively small, with only three lines, but the lines within them are relatively long, with twelve syllables.  This reflects the idea that dragonflies are small and large at the same time.  Additionally, the varied indentions are meant to reflect the flying of the dragonfly.

The form looks like this:

Line

                    Line

          Line

 

                              Line

                    Line

                         Line

 

                                                  Line

          Line

                    Line

 

Experimental Poetry Form: Bird’s Nest

This experimental poetry form is based off of a bird’s nest:  it is tangled, but it fits together.  There is a photograph and an artwork of a bird’s nest as part of set twenty two on MSakran.com.

The tangled part of this form are the lines of different syllable counts.  There are:

  • 3 lines with 8 syllables each
  • 2 lines with 6 syllables each
  • 1 line with 5 syllables
  • 1 line with 4 syllables
  • 4 lines with 2 syllables each

The lines are in the order below:

8 syllable line
4 syllable line
2 syllable line
5 syllable line
2 syllable line
8 syllable line
6 syllable line
2 syllable line
6 syllable line
8 syllable line
2 syllable line

The lines have no meter.

The fitting together part of the form is that all the lines rhyme.  This means that 11 rhymes need to be thought of.  Because of this high number, after the first line, the last word of the line should be checked to see if there are ten words that rhyme with it.

Here is a poem written in the form:

Driving along an unknown way,
during mid-May,
one day,
past fields of cut hay,
with Ray,
   or was it instead that guy Jay?
   Someone who knows might say.
Say hey,
there was this small blue jay,
out where all that cut hay just lay,
said Fay.

Experimental Poetry Form: Two coins

This experimental poetry form is based off of the idea of having two coins.  If there are two coins, assuming they can’t be distinguished from each other, they can be arranged in the following ways:

Heads Heads
Tails Tails
Heads Tails
Tails Heads

(Assuming the coins could be distinguished from each other, there would be different arrangements, for example instead of “Tails Tails” there would be “Tails (Coin 1) Tails (Coin 2)/ Tails (Coin 2) Tails (Coin 1)”)

Using these arrangements, a poetry form can be developed.  One idea would be to have four couplets using two types of lines.  The couplets could be arranged like above:

Line with characteristics A
Line with characteristics A

Line with characteristics B
Line with characteristics B

Line with characteristics A
Line with characteristics B

Line with characteristics B
Line with characteristics A

 

The characteristics could vary.  One idea would be to have the A characteristics be:

 eight syllables, iambic meter, rhyme one

and have the B characteristics be:

 eight syllables, trochaic meter, rhyme two

The idea is that each characteristic set represents one side of a coin.  They both have the same value (eight syllables), but they are opposite each other (iambic vs. trochaic meter) and they look different (rhyme one vs. rhyme two).

As a side note, M. Sakran would be interested to see any poems written and posted in this form today.  If any poet uses this form today, please use the tag “Two Coins” so M. Sakran has the opportunity to find and read the poems.

Experimental Poetry Form: Paragraph of poems

This experimental poetry form is a paragraph that consists of ten sentences.  The paragraph is formed in three stages.

In the first stage, ten poems are written.  Each poem consists of three lines.  The syllable counts for each line are noted below.  Each poem should be self-contained, but should flow from one to the next.  The syllable counts of the lines are:

Poem 1: 4, 4, 4

Poem 2: 7, 7, 4

Poem 3: 6, 6, 8

Poem 4: 8, 8, 2

Poem 5: 5, 5, 5

Poem 6: 8, 6, 4

Poem 7: 3, 3, 7

Poem 8: 4, 7, 4

Poem 9: 5, 4, 3

Poem 10: 2, 8, 8

In the second stage, each three line poem is written as a sentence.  The words are kept the same, but punctuation is changed as necessary.

In the third stage, the sentences are put together to form one paragraph.

The idea of this form is to see how writing the sentences of a paragraph as three line poems first, changes how the paragraph sounds, compared to how it would sound had the sentences been written in a free style.

To illustrate the form, here is an example with three sentences.  In the first stage, three poems are written using the syllable counts noted above:

 

Poem 1:

 Mowing the grass,
 it didn’t seem,
 to be so hot.

Poem 2:

 But once the mower was pushed,
 back and forth across the lawn,
 it did seem so.

Poem 3:

 Sweat was on the forehead,
 and soaked through the t-shirt,
 and seemed to drip onto the ground.

 

In the second stage, those poems are written as sentences:

Sentence 1: Mowing the grass, it didn’t seem to be so hot.

Sentence 2: But once the mower was pushed back and forth across the lawn, it did seem so.

Sentence 3:  Sweat was on the forehead, and soaked through the t-shirt, and seemed to drip onto the ground.

 

In the third stage, those sentences are combined into a paragraph:

Mowing the grass, it didn’t seem to be so hot.  But once the mower was pushed back and forth across the lawn, it did seem so.  Sweat was on the forehead, and soaked through the t-shirt, and seemed to drip onto the ground.

 

The idea here, is that writing the sentences as poems first, had an influence on how the paragraph sounded once it was done.  The paragraph, presumably, would sound different, had it been written simply as a normal paragraph.

Experimental Poetry Form: Seven lines, random syllable counts, and a rhyming pattern

This experimental poetry form consists of seven lines.  The lines have the following syllable counts: 11, 9, 10, 7, 12, 6 and 9.  The syllable counts were determined, by shuffling a deck of cards, dealing out seven and giving syllable counts corresponding to the values.  The rhyming pattern is AABABBA.  This pattern matches the odd/even qualities of the syllables counts of the lines.  Odd lines, are A rhymes, even lines, are B rhymes.  The form has no meter.  Here is an example poem written in the form:

Upon the soft grass and looking up so high,
and seeing a hawk as it does fly,
gliding above without flapping a wing,
makes one think and wonder why,
as the hawk flies above in a circular ring,
why there it does not sing,
because it seems with joy it would try.

P.S. Voting is available this week, for next week’s poem series.  Please see this past Monday’s Post to vote or use the form below.  The possible topics are The Sun, The Color Green, Coins, Carrots, and Sound.  To vote using the form below, click a topic and then click submit.