Experimental Poetry Form: three columns

Today’s experimental poetry form is called three columns.  As the name suggests, it contains three columns.  Each column has ten lines and each column should have an equal width.  Here is an example poem to illustrate the form:

The dog is going
to the vet today.
He doesn’t want to go.
He doesn’t know
he’s going to go,
but still,
he doesn’t want to go.
Still,
going to the vet,
is important.
The man is going
to the doctor today.
He doesn’t want to go.
He doesn’t know,
he’s going to go,
but still,
he doesn’t want to go.
Still,
going to the doctor,
is important.
The child is going
to the dentist today.
He doesn’t want to go.
He doesn’t know,
he’s going to go,
but still,
he doesn’t want to go.
Still,
going to the dentist,
is important.

 

This example poem takes the idea of the three columns further, and uses a pattern.  In each poem, the being going somewhere is changed and where they are going is changed.  Everything else is the same.  The idea in this case is to reinforce the idea about a being getting needed medical care, not knowing they are going to get it, and them not really wanting to go.

Experimental Poetry Form: two and three

This experimental poetry form is called two and three.  It is fairly simple.  The poem has ten lines that alternate having two and three syllables per line.  Using syllable counts to show the lines, the form looks like this:

2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3

Here is an example poem written in the form:

Guess what?
It is soon.
It is.
Near a year.
Next week.
Excited?
You are.
It’s so cool.
Just think,
one whole year.

P. S. The poem above is about M. Sakran’s self-published eBook, Understanding: poems with explanations. It’s an eBook of poems with explanations. The one year anniversary of its self-publication is this Wednesday, the 27th.  If you like the poems with explanations that have been on this blog, you might like the eBook too.

Poem with an explanation: The Spider

The spider ran and hid,
away from its own web,
to hide from eyes that saw,

and with such haste it did,
for it did fear the neb,
as it did hear the caw,

behind a branch it slid,
for fear its health would ebb,
as it was stunned with awe.

 

The above poem uses the experimental poetry form Three that was described in the April 26, 2014 blog post of this blog.  The form can be reviewed here: Experimental Poetry Form: Three

This poem is about a spider hiding from a bird.  The image is of a spider on a branch.  The spider is seen by a bird and runs and hides behind another branch so that it will not be eaten.  One point about the poem is that the spider was willing to leave its web for the sake of its safety.  The implication is that the web might in some way be lost to the spider as a result of its hiding but that this was worth it to the spider so that it could avoid the bird.