Experimental Poetry Form: here’s a tip

This experimental poetry form is based off of the poem: here’s a tip.  The idea was to start with a form that was written naturally, and modify it to have more form elements.

The original poem had five lines.  The first four lines were separated with one blank line between each of them and the fifth line had two blank lines between it and the fourth line.  The lines had the following syllable counts: six, ten, nine, three, and four.  There was no rhyming.  There was no meter.

To modify the original form, the basic structure was kept: four lines with a blank line between each of them and a fifth line with two blank lines setting it apart.  It looks as follows

*

*

*

*
 
 
*

Secondly, the syllable count was modified to have more of a pattern.  The original counts were: 6, 10, 9, 3, and 4.  This was modified to: 6, 10, 10, 4, and 4.

Third, rhyme was added.  The two ten syllable lines rhyme and the two four syllable lines rhyme.

Fourth, iambic meter was added to the lines.

The end result is a form that looks as follows:

*/*/*/

*/*/*/*/*/  A

*/*/*/*/*/  A

*/*/*/*/  B
 
 
*/*/*/*/  B

The *s represent short syllables, the /s represent long syllables, and the letters show the rhyming pairs.

The idea of this form is to see how a naturally written form can be transformed into a more structured form and what that results in.

Here is an example poem written in the form:

to see the dial turn

and mark the weight of all the days before

when all did see but then did little more

the eyes do close
 
 
from weight of woes