Bilingual Poem: Somewhere there are lies

Somewhere there are lies,
blocking the sound of truth,
claiming they are wise,
somewhere there are lies.
With force there are cries,
in a way that is uncouth,
somewhere there are lies,
blocking the sound of truth.

El alguna parte hay mentiras,
bloqueando el sonido de verdad,
afirmando ellos son sabio,
el alguna parte hay mentiras.
Con fuerza hay gritos,
en una manera es grosero,
el alguna parte hay mentiras,
bloqueando el sonido de verdad.

 

P.S.  The bookmark giveaway is still ongoing.  Please see the bookmark giveaway post for information.

 

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Bilingual Poem: The other side

One side, the other side – reflect,
the change of place is not thought on,
the light that’s on eyes don’t detect,
one side, the other side – reflect.
If said aloud some might object,
and say the past it is so gone,
one side, the other side – reflect,
the change of place is not thought on.

Uno lado, el otro lado – relfexionan,
el cambio de lugar no es pensaron en,
la luz ese es en ojos no descubren,
uno lado, el otro lado – relfexionan.
Si dijo en voz alta es possible algunos poner reparos,
y dicen el pasado es tan fue,
uno lado, el otro lado – relfexionan,
el cambio de lugar no es pensaron en.

 

Notes:

As noted previously, M. Sakran is not bilingual, and therefore there may be some errors in the Spanish translation above.  Please forgive any errors in the translation.

The English poem is written as a triolet.  That form, was not necessarily maintained in the Spanish translation.

Poem with an explanation: Finches and leaves

The finches flew about the sky,
as fallen leaves blew in the breeze,
their wings did flap as they flew high,
the finches flew about the sky.
As up above the flock went by,
the leaves blew on with simple ease,
the finches flew about the sky,
as fallen leaves blew in the breeze.

The above poem is a triolet.  The idea of the poem is the relation of two images: finches flying and leaves blowing.  The A rhyme lines (lines 1, 3, 4, 5, and 7) are about the finches flying, and the B rhyme lines (lines 2, 6, and 8) are about the leaves blowing.  The images are a similar: a group of birds moving and a group of leaves moving, but they also contrast: the birds are active (they are flying) and the leaves are passive (they are being blown).

Poem: Un-done things

Un-done things

The un-ironed clothes,
are pressed inside a small drawer,
that hardly can close.

The plants on the porch,
  the ones in the colored pots,
need to be watered,
or they are going to dry out,
and they will not live there long.

The dog,
is shedding hair.
  It needs to be comb through,
  or he will itch and be so hot,
  all month.

 

There are so many things that are un-done,
the three above are just a few –

another is the fan in the bedroom doesn’t run,

 
there are so many things that are un-done.

 
The pantry that had fifteen boxes now has none,
  and the chair in the kitchen needs some glue,

 
there are so many things that are un-done,
the three above are just a few.

Poetry topic idea: Gray sky

Last week on M. Sakran’s blog of and about poetry and poetry related things, there was an invitation for poetry form suggestions.  Unfortunately, none were suggested.  Because of this, today’s post, tomorrow’s and the next day’s will have poetry forms found by M. Sakran that have not been mentioned in tags on this blog.

Today’s post will have a poem written using the poetry form Triolet.

Today’s post is focused on a poetry topic idea.  The poetry topic idea is gray sky.

Having a gray sky, a sky that is overcast, but not dark enough for there to be rain, can be an interesting poetry idea.

A gray sky can generally set a scene.  It can bring a feeling of somberness or just generally create a mood.  Imagine someone walking down a street on a sunny day, and then imagine the same scene with a gray sky.  The sense can feel different.  This feeling can be used in a poem.

A gray sky can be used as a point of contrast.  A poem, for example, could contain both a bright and a gray scene, and use the sky to set the tone.

In some ways, a gray sky is a point of almost.  The sky almost has rain, but it does not.  Whether rain in the poem symbolizes something positive or negative, a gray sky implies that things aren’t quite there.  Whatever might happen, may happen soon or the gray sky might symbolize that it will not happen, but almost did.  Depending on the symbolic quality of rain in the poem, these could have different meanings.

Here is a triolet that uses the poetry topic idea gray sky:

The sky was filled with clouds of gray,
that hid the light that would have shown,
out in the world on the winter day,
the sky was filled with clouds of gray,
and as she stood with no words to say,
in front of the grave and alone,
the sky was filled with clouds of gray,
that hid the light that would have shown.