Bilingual Poem: with time

With time
the words
say something new
if you read
with new eyes.

 

Con tiempo
las palabras
hablan algo nuevo
si lee
con ojos nuevo.

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Experimental Poetry Form: footprints

Today’s poetry form is called footprints.  It is based off of layout on the page and letter counts.  The form looks as follows:

*****     *****     *****     *****     *****     *****     *****     *****     *****     *****

     *****     *****     *****     *****     *****     *****     *****     *****     *****     *****

In the form, there are twenty words – ten on the first line, and ten on the second.  Each word is separated by five spaces.  The second line is indented five spaces.  Each word is five letters.

The idea is that the words resemble footprints.  Each footprint (word) is the same length, there is an equal amount of length between footprints, and the footprints are side by side, but offset.

When reading the poem, it should be read alternating from one line to the other, like feet walk.  The first word read, is the first word of the first line.  The second word read, is the first word of the second line.  The third word read, is the second word of the first line.  The forth word read, is the second word of the second line.  This pattern continues for the whole poem.

Here is an example poem:

Ideas     among     minds     where     glows     night     while     among     speak     words

     known     human     dwell     light     after     wanes     hopes     stars     quiet     aloud.

Experimental Poetry Form: Twenty one word lines

Today’s experimental poetry form is called twenty one word lines.  It consists of twenty lines, each with one word.  The idea of the form was inspired by the poem in the post from March 8, 2019.  That poem was a train of thought poem that had nineteen lines, with most being one word.

Although the form could be used to create a train of thought poem (where one idea leads to the next like with word association), it could also be used to write out a sentence or something else.

Here is an example poem that is a train of thought poem:

hunger
food
fruit
stand
roadside
cars
dirt
clean
water
soap
bars
prison
concrete
driveway
mailbox
letter
open
close
business
hours

Some train of thought poems, like the one above, just lead off.  They have no circularity.  Some train of thought poems, like the one from the March 8th post, do have a circularity.  There are other effects as well.

Here is another example poem.  This one is one sentence broken up:

Having
no
shower,
he
did
his
best,
and
washed
his
face,
arms,
and
hands
in
the
convenience
store
bathroom
sink.

A photograph to inspire poetry: lemon flower

lemon flower

Above is a photograph of a lemon flower.  It can inspire poetry.  A poet could write about:

  • The future. This flower in the future may become a lemon.  A poet could write about what something or someone might become in the future.
  •  

  • Potential. This flower has the potential to become a lemon.  A poet could write about a person or a thing that has potential.
  •  

  • Aroma. This flower has a sweet aroma.  A poet could write about scent and aroma.  They could apply the idea to flowers, perfume, food, and other things.
  •  

  • Temporariness. This flower is temporary. At some point the blossom will fade.  A poet could apply this idea to many situations.
  •  

  • Lemonade. This flower may turn into a lemon.  That lemon may be turned into lemonade.  A poet could write about this literally, metaphorically, or they could work with the expression about life giving a person lemons and that person making lemonade.  They could apply the idea to making the best of a situation.

Here is an example poem:

lemon
yellow
crayon
drawing
sunset
orange color
orange fruit
juice
breakfast
pancakes
syrup
maple trees
forests
leaves
green
grass
sunshine
yellow
lemon

Poem with an explanation: having walked in the shoes

Having walked in the shoes,
one would think,
the words would be known,
but having walked in the shoes,
somehow,
there are no words.

 

This poem is about death and relatability.  The poem focuses on two people: a person who experienced a death in the short range past, and a person who has just experienced a death.  In the poem, the overt focus is on the first person.

The poem looks at the idea, that one would presume, that a person who has experienced something in the past, would know what to say to someone who has just experienced the same thing.  The reality though, in some situations, is that the experience of having been through something brings the realization that there are no sufficient words to say to someone else who has just experienced it.

In the poem, the person who experienced a death in the short range past has experienced the same thing as the person who has just experienced a death.  In a sense, they have walked in their shoes.  With this experience though, when called upon to say something comforting to the person who has just experienced a death, they realize there is nothing they can say.  They know what it is like, and they understand the inadequacy of any words they would use, and so they are at a loss for words.

As form elements, this poem repeats ideas.  It repeats the idea, and the exact phrase of, “having walked in the shoes”, and it repeats the idea of “words”.

 

If you liked this poem with an explanation, please consider purchasing a copy of the eBook: Understanding: poems with explanations.

Experimental Poetry Form: puzzle pieces

Today’s experimental poetry form is called puzzle pieces.  The form works in a way such that the first part can be combined with the second part.

The poem is written as two stanzas.  The first stanza has five lines, each with four words.  The second stanza has five lines, each with one word.

Each stanza may or may not make sense on their own, however, if they are combined properly, the resulting stanza would make sense. They can be combined in such a way that the words from stanza two could become the end words for stanza one, with each stanza two word combining with its corresponding line in stanza one.  This is an element of the form.

Here is how the form looks:

****[A]
****[B]
****[C]
****[D]
****[E]

A
B
C
D
E

 

The *’s represent words in the first stanza.  The bracketed letters in the first stanza are place holders for the corresponding words in the second stanza.  In using the form, the bracketed letters would be blank spaces.  The bracketed letters represent the spaces where the words from stanza two would fit if they were written in stanza one (although they are not written in stanza one for the use of the form).  Again, being able to fit these words into stanza one, is an element of the form.

The idea of the form is to show a poem in pieces.  It is similar to a puzzle in pieces.  The first stanza represents the part of the puzzle that is mostly completed, and the second stanza represents the remaining pieces.

The idea is that while each part may or may not make sense on its own, the reader should be able to see how they fit together.  This adds to the effect of the poem by engaging the reader.

To make the form easier to use, a poet could write a five line one stanza poem with five words per line, and then transform it to this form.  Below is an example which illustrates this, as well as the general use of the form.

Below is an example poem with one stanza, with five lines and five words per line.

The cat hid so quietly
as the dogs moved quickly
it watched the danger move
knowing that its presence unseen
in the shadows vanished away.

 

To apply the form, this poem is then broken into two stanzas as follows:

The cat hid so
as the dogs moved
it watched the danger
knowing that its presence
in the shadows vanished

quietly
quickly
move
unseen
away

 

This new poem follows the form.  As can be seen, the end words from each of the first five lines became lines of their own as a second stanza.  If the words were put back, the poem would make sense.

As can be seen in this example, the form can be used such that the two stanzas of the form, both separately and together, as well as the combined part that would normally not be written for the reader, can each make sense.  Having the separate stanzas make sense each alone, as well as if read together, can be more difficult than simply writing the combined poem and then breaking it up without regard for how it reads in pieces, but if done, this adds to the effect of the poem.

Experimental Poetry Form: Twenty words

This experimental poetry form is called twenty words.  As the name implies, it has twenty words.  In addition to that, there are other form requirements.  Those requirements pertain to number of stanzas, lines per stanza, line indentions, line breaks and rhyming.  The idea was to add to the simple notion of a twenty word poem.

The structure is as follows:

A three word line
A two word line
A line break
A one word line, that is a rhyming word, indented two spaces
A line break
A two word line
A three word line
A line break
A three word line, indented four spaces
A line break
A one word line, that is a rhyming word, indented two spaces
A two word line
A line break
A two word line, indented four spaces
A line break
A one word line, that is a rhyming word.

Here is an example poem written in the form:

The clock ticks
seconds pass

  flowing.

Each moment
moves ever onward.

    Birds fly away

  knowing
time passes

    onward never

slowing.

Experimental Poetry Form: nine squares

This experimental poetry form is called nine squares.  The poem is mainly based on the layout on the page.

The poem consists of nine stanzas.  Each stanza is a square.  Each stanza consists of three lines, with three words per line.  The poem is laid out in nine squares as shown below:

***                         ***                         ***
***                         ***                         ***
***                         ***                         ***

 

***                         ***                         ***
***                         ***                         ***
***                         ***                         ***

 

***                         ***                         ***
***                         ***                         ***
***                         ***                         ***

Each * represents a word and each block of *’s represents a stanza.  Depending on what the poet wants, the poem could be read by row or by column.  The spacing between columns can be variable as long as it is consistent between columns and gives the look of blocks as shown above.  The same notion applies to the spacing between rows.

 

P. S. This is the one hundredth “singular” experimental poetry form on this blog. It is the one hundredth experimental poetry from that isn’t in some way part of something else, such as a post series.

Experimental Poetry Form: Eight, eight and first words

This experimental poetry form called is eight, eight and first words.  In the form, there are eight lines.  Each line has eight words.  There is a word pattern as follows:

The first word of the second line, is the second word of the first line.

The first word of the third line, is the third word of the first line.

The first word of the fourth line, is the fourth word of the first line.

.
.
.

The first word of the eighth line, is the eighth word of the first line.

The form looks as follows with *’s representing words that aren’t repeated with any intention, and letters representing repeated words:

ABCDEFGH
B*******
C*******
D*******
E*******
F*******
G*******
H*******

Here is an example poem:

There thinking back upon the past decision made,
thinking of the moment of choice that day,
back in the place with the stone pathways,
upon the ground with the designation of thought,
the deep sense of stepping forward with words,
past decisions though cannot be changed with sense,
decision is a stone with a great weight,
made by moments of past thoughts and times.

Some issues to keep in mind when using the form are, first, to think about the form of words in the first line.  The form of verb or whether a noun is singular or plural can affect its use as the first word of another line.  Also, counting by words may not be as natural to some as counting by syllables.  Counting the words of each line as each is written would be advisable.  Thirdly, there is the idea that the poem must make sense in the form.  It must fit within it and still have some clarity.

Poem: Oh please forgive

Oh please forgive,
the short delay,
for time it did so flow.

The words,
with sound,
and flow,
and sight,
they should,
have been,
out here,
at light.

But things,
oh things,
they did,
so come,
and time,
did flow,
and distract some.

But here,
the words,
they have appeared,
so please,
do hold,
no grudge.

It took,
some time,
for all,
to flow,
and have,
these words,
now budge.

Thanks,
to all.